Aeschylus

(525 BC - 455 BC / Eleusis)

Aeschylus Quotes

  • ''Self-will in the man who does not reckon wisely is by itself the weakest of all things.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 1012.
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  • ''Or don't you know, so exceedingly clever as you are, that a vain tongue must pay the penalty?''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 328.
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  • ''You have been trapped in the inescapable net of ruin by your own want of sense.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 1078.
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  • ''I have learned to hate all traitors, and there is no disease that I spit on more than treachery.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 1068.
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  • ''The will was of Zeus, the hand of Hephaestus.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 619.
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  • ''It is a light thing for whoever keeps his foot outside trouble to advise and counsel him that suffers.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 263.
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  • ''For it would be better to die once and for all than to suffer pain for all one's life.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 750.
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  • ''For the lips of Zeus do not know how to lie, but bring to fulfilment every word.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 1032.
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  • ''For know that no one is free, except Zeus.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 50.
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  • ''Don't you know this, that words are doctors to a diseased temperment?''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 378.
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Best Poem of Aeschylus

The Sacrifice Of Iphigenia

Now long and long from wintry Strymon blew
The weary, hungry, anchor-straining blasts,
The winds that wandering seamen dearly rue,
Nor spared the cables worn and groaning masts;
And, lingering on, in indolent delay,
Slow wasted all the strength of Greece away.
But when the shrill-voiced prophet 'gan proclaim
That remedy more dismal and more dread
Than the drear weather blackening overhead,
And spoke in Artemis' most awful name,
The sons of Atreus, 'mid their armed peers,
Their sceptres dashed to earth, and each broke out in tears,
And thus the ...

Read the full of The Sacrifice Of Iphigenia

The Beacon Fires

A GLEAM -- a gleam -- from Ida's height,
By the Fire-god sent, it came;
From watch to watch it leapt, that light,
As a rider rode the flame!
It shot through the startled sky,
And the torch of that blazing glory
Old Lemnos caught on high,
On its holy promontory,
And sent it on, the jocund sign,