Aeschylus

(525 BC - 455 BC / Eleusis)

Aeschylus Quotes

  • ''Self-will in the man who does not reckon wisely is by itself the weakest of all things.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 1012.
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  • ''Or don't you know, so exceedingly clever as you are, that a vain tongue must pay the penalty?''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 328.
  • ''You have been trapped in the inescapable net of ruin by your own want of sense.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 1078.
  • ''I have learned to hate all traitors, and there is no disease that I spit on more than treachery.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 1068.
  • ''The will was of Zeus, the hand of Hephaestus.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 619.
  • ''It is a light thing for whoever keeps his foot outside trouble to advise and counsel him that suffers.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 263.
  • ''For it would be better to die once and for all than to suffer pain for all one's life.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 750.
  • ''For the lips of Zeus do not know how to lie, but bring to fulfilment every word.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 1032.
  • ''For know that no one is free, except Zeus.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 50.
  • ''Don't you know this, that words are doctors to a diseased temperment?''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 378.

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Best Poem of Aeschylus

The Battle Of Salamis

The night was passing, and the Grecian host
By no means sought to issue forth unseen.
But when indeed the day with her white steeds
Held all the earth, resplendent to behold,
First from the Greeks the loud-resounding din
Of song triumphant came; and shrill at once
Echo responded from the island rock.
Then upon all barbarians terror fell,
Thus disappointed; for not as for flight
The Hellenes sang the holy pæan then,
But setting forth to battle valiantly.
The bugle with its note inflamed them all;
And straightway with the dip of plashing oars ...

Read the full of The Battle Of Salamis

Song Of The Furies

Up and lead the dance of Fate!
Lift the song that mortals hate!
Tell what rights are ours on earth,
Over all of human birth.
Swift of foot to avenge are we!
He whose hands are clean and pure,
Naught our wrath to dread hath he;
Calm his cloudless days endure.
But the man that seeks to hide

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