Aeschylus

(525 BC - 455 BC / Eleusis)

Aeschylus Quotes

  • ''There is no disgrace in an enemy suffering ill at an enemy's hand, when you hate mutually.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 1041.
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  • ''You are by nature much better at advising others than yourself. I draw my proof from deeds not words.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Prometheus Bound, l. 335.
  • ''By Time and Age full many things are taught.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek dramatist. Prometheus, in Prometheus Bound, l. 981, trans. by Gilbert Murray.
  • ''These things are not inscribed in tablets, not sealed in the folds of papyri, but you hear them clearly from the tongue in a free mouth.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Suppliants, l. 946.
  • ''Ares gives his verdict without witnesses.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Suppliants, l. 934.
  • ''For children preserve the fame of a man after his death.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 505.
  • ''The anvil of justice is planted firm, and fate who makes the sword does the forging in advance.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 646.
  • ''What atonement is there for blood spilt upon the earth?''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 48.
  • ''Making it a valid law to learn by suffering.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 177.
  • ''Unions in wedlock are perverted by the victory of shameless passion that masters the female among men and beasts.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 599.

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Best Poem of Aeschylus

The Battle Of Salamis

The night was passing, and the Grecian host
By no means sought to issue forth unseen.
But when indeed the day with her white steeds
Held all the earth, resplendent to behold,
First from the Greeks the loud-resounding din
Of song triumphant came; and shrill at once
Echo responded from the island rock.
Then upon all barbarians terror fell,
Thus disappointed; for not as for flight
The Hellenes sang the holy pæan then,
But setting forth to battle valiantly.
The bugle with its note inflamed them all;
And straightway with the dip of plashing oars ...

Read the full of The Battle Of Salamis

The Battle Of Salamis

The night was passing, and the Grecian host
By no means sought to issue forth unseen.
But when indeed the day with her white steeds
Held all the earth, resplendent to behold,
First from the Greeks the loud-resounding din
Of song triumphant came; and shrill at once
Echo responded from the island rock.
Then upon all barbarians terror fell,
Thus disappointed; for not as for flight

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