Aeschylus

(525 BC - 455 BC / Eleusis)

Aeschylus Quotes

  • ''And though all streams flow from a single course to cleanse the blood from polluted hand, they hasten on their course in vain.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 72.
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  • ''"Let the doer suffer;" so goes a thrice-old saying.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 313.
  • ''We shall perish by guile just as we slew.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 888.
  • ''Justice turns the scale, bringing to some learning through suffering.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 250.
  • ''For hostile word let hostile word be paid.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 309.
  • ''On him who wields power gently, the god looks favorably from afar.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 951.
  • ''For a murderous blow let murderous blow atone.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 312.
  • ''Justice shines in very smoky homes, and honors the righteous; but the gold-spangled mansions where the hands are unclean she leaves with eyes averted.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 773.
  • ''From a small seed a mighty trunk may grow.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 204.
  • ''You shall learn, though late, the lesson of how to be discreet.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 1423.

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Best Poem of Aeschylus

The Battle Of Salamis

The night was passing, and the Grecian host
By no means sought to issue forth unseen.
But when indeed the day with her white steeds
Held all the earth, resplendent to behold,
First from the Greeks the loud-resounding din
Of song triumphant came; and shrill at once
Echo responded from the island rock.
Then upon all barbarians terror fell,
Thus disappointed; for not as for flight
The Hellenes sang the holy pæan then,
But setting forth to battle valiantly.
The bugle with its note inflamed them all;
And straightway with the dip of plashing oars ...

Read the full of The Battle Of Salamis

Song Of The Furies

Up and lead the dance of Fate!
Lift the song that mortals hate!
Tell what rights are ours on earth,
Over all of human birth.
Swift of foot to avenge are we!
He whose hands are clean and pure,
Naught our wrath to dread hath he;
Calm his cloudless days endure.
But the man that seeks to hide

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