Aeschylus

(525 BC - 455 BC / Eleusis)

Aeschylus Quotes

  • ''I say that the dead are slaying the living.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Libation Bearers, l. 886.
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  • ''Of prosperity mortals can never have enough.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 1331.
  • ''Shoals of corpses shall witness, mute, even to generations to come, before the eyes of men that we ought never, being mortal, to cast our sights too high.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Persians, l. 818.
  • ''Who apart from the gods is without pain for his whole lifetime's length?''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 553.
  • ''For insolence, once blossoming, bears its fruit, a bushel of doom, from which it reaps a tear-filled harvest.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Persians, l. 821.
  • ''I know that men in exile feed on hopes.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 1668.
  • ''For the impious act begets more after it, like to the parent stock.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 758.
  • ''As long as there are men the bulwark is safe.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Persians, l. 349.
  • ''Since long I've held silence a remedy for harm.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 177.
  • ''The rest I keep silent; a great ox stands on my tongue.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 36.

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Best Poem of Aeschylus

The Battle Of Salamis

The night was passing, and the Grecian host
By no means sought to issue forth unseen.
But when indeed the day with her white steeds
Held all the earth, resplendent to behold,
First from the Greeks the loud-resounding din
Of song triumphant came; and shrill at once
Echo responded from the island rock.
Then upon all barbarians terror fell,
Thus disappointed; for not as for flight
The Hellenes sang the holy pæan then,
But setting forth to battle valiantly.
The bugle with its note inflamed them all;
And straightway with the dip of plashing oars ...

Read the full of The Battle Of Salamis

Song Of The Furies

Up and lead the dance of Fate!
Lift the song that mortals hate!
Tell what rights are ours on earth,
Over all of human birth.
Swift of foot to avenge are we!
He whose hands are clean and pure,
Naught our wrath to dread hath he;
Calm his cloudless days endure.
But the man that seeks to hide

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