Aeschylus

(525 BC - 455 BC / Eleusis)

Aeschylus Quotes

  • ''The field of doom bears death as its harvest.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Seven Against Thebes, l. 601.
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  • ''Ares, gold-changer of bodies.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 438.
  • ''When a tongue fails to send forth appropriate shafts, there might be a word to act as healer of these.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Suppliants, l. 446.
  • ''If you pour oil and vinegar into the same vessel, you would call them not friends but opponents.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 322.
  • ''The evils of mortals are manifold; nowhere is trouble of the same wing seen.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Suppliants, l. 327.
  • ''Alas for the affairs of men! When they are fortunate you might compare them to a shadow; and if they are unfortunate, a wet sponge with one dash wipes the picture away.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 1327.
  • ''Relentless persuasion overbears him, irresistible child of forecounseling destruction.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 385.
  • ''But ancient insolence is wont to bear an insolence that has its youth among human miseries, sooner or later, when the fixed time of birth is come.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 764.
  • ''For the poison of hatred seated near the heart doubles the burden for the one who suffers the disease; he is burdened with his own sorrow, and groans on seeing another's happiness.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 834.
  • ''For there is no defense for a man who, in the excess of his wealth, has kicked the great altar of Justice out of sight.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 381.

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Best Poem of Aeschylus

The Battle Of Salamis

The night was passing, and the Grecian host
By no means sought to issue forth unseen.
But when indeed the day with her white steeds
Held all the earth, resplendent to behold,
First from the Greeks the loud-resounding din
Of song triumphant came; and shrill at once
Echo responded from the island rock.
Then upon all barbarians terror fell,
Thus disappointed; for not as for flight
The Hellenes sang the holy pæan then,
But setting forth to battle valiantly.
The bugle with its note inflamed them all;
And straightway with the dip of plashing oars ...

Read the full of The Battle Of Salamis

A Prayer For Artemis

STROPHE IV

Though Zeus plan all things right,
Yet is his heart's desire full hard to trace;
Nathless in every place
Brightly it gleameth, e'en in darkest night,
Fraught with black fate to man's speech-gifted race.

ANTISTROPHE IV

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