Aeschylus

(525 BC - 455 BC / Eleusis)

Aeschylus Quotes

  • ''For Hades is mighty in calling men to account below the earth, and with a mind that records in tablets he surveys all things.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 273.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Striking his former happiness against the reef of justice he has perished unwept for and unseen.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 563.
  • ''In the lack of judgment great harm arises, but one vote cast can set right a house.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 750.
  • ''I say you must not win an unjust case by oaths.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 433.
  • ''And one who is just of his own free will shall not lack for happiness; and he will never come to utter ruin.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 550.
  • ''You wish to be thought to act justly than to do so.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 430.
  • ''But when once the earth has sucked up a dead man's blood, there is no way to raise him up.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 647.
  • ''For the marriage bed ordained by fate for men and women is stronger than an oath and guarded by Justice.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 217.
  • ''Neither a life of anarchy nor one beneath a despot should you praise; to all that lies in the middle a god has given excellence.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 526.
  • ''But from the good health of the mind comes that which is dear to all and the object of prayer—happiness.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 535.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of Aeschylus

The Battle Of Salamis

The night was passing, and the Grecian host
By no means sought to issue forth unseen.
But when indeed the day with her white steeds
Held all the earth, resplendent to behold,
First from the Greeks the loud-resounding din
Of song triumphant came; and shrill at once
Echo responded from the island rock.
Then upon all barbarians terror fell,
Thus disappointed; for not as for flight
The Hellenes sang the holy pæan then,
But setting forth to battle valiantly.
The bugle with its note inflamed them all;
And straightway with the dip of plashing oars ...

Read the full of The Battle Of Salamis

Song Of The Furies

Up and lead the dance of Fate!
Lift the song that mortals hate!
Tell what rights are ours on earth,
Over all of human birth.
Swift of foot to avenge are we!
He whose hands are clean and pure,
Naught our wrath to dread hath he;
Calm his cloudless days endure.
But the man that seeks to hide

[Report Error]