Aeschylus

(525 BC - 455 BC / Eleusis)

Aeschylus Quotes

  • ''I, schooled in misery, know many purifying rites, and I know where speech is proper and where silence.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 276.
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  • ''Death is easier than a wretched life; and better never to have born than to live and fare badly.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 984.
  • ''It is good even for old men to learn wisdom.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 278.
  • ''It is not the oath that makes us believe the man, but the man the oath.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek dramatist. Fragments, no. 385, trans. by M.H. Morgan.
  • ''Oaths are not the credit of men but men of oaths.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 276.
  • ''What good is it to live a life that brings pains?''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 163.
  • ''When strength is yoked with justice, where is a mightier pair than they?''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 298.
  • ''Of all the gods only death does not desire gifts.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 147.
  • ''Nor does the man sitting by the hearth beneath his roof better escape his fated doom.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 286.
  • ''Base men who prosper are unenviable.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 281.

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Best Poem of Aeschylus

The Battle Of Salamis

The night was passing, and the Grecian host
By no means sought to issue forth unseen.
But when indeed the day with her white steeds
Held all the earth, resplendent to behold,
First from the Greeks the loud-resounding din
Of song triumphant came; and shrill at once
Echo responded from the island rock.
Then upon all barbarians terror fell,
Thus disappointed; for not as for flight
The Hellenes sang the holy pæan then,
But setting forth to battle valiantly.
The bugle with its note inflamed them all;
And straightway with the dip of plashing oars ...

Read the full of The Battle Of Salamis

The Battle Of Salamis

The night was passing, and the Grecian host
By no means sought to issue forth unseen.
But when indeed the day with her white steeds
Held all the earth, resplendent to behold,
First from the Greeks the loud-resounding din
Of song triumphant came; and shrill at once
Echo responded from the island rock.
Then upon all barbarians terror fell,
Thus disappointed; for not as for flight

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