Aeschylus

(525 BC - 455 BC / Eleusis)

Aeschylus Quotes

  • ''I, schooled in misery, know many purifying rites, and I know where speech is proper and where silence.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Eumenides, l. 276.
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  • ''Death is easier than a wretched life; and better never to have born than to live and fare badly.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 984.
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  • ''It is good even for old men to learn wisdom.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 278.
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  • ''It is not the oath that makes us believe the man, but the man the oath.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek dramatist. Fragments, no. 385, trans. by M.H. Morgan.
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  • ''Oaths are not the credit of men but men of oaths.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 276.
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  • ''What good is it to live a life that brings pains?''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 163.
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  • ''When strength is yoked with justice, where is a mightier pair than they?''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 298.
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  • ''Of all the gods only death does not desire gifts.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 147.
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  • ''Nor does the man sitting by the hearth beneath his roof better escape his fated doom.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 286.
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  • ''Base men who prosper are unenviable.''
    Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Fragments, l. 281.
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Best Poem of Aeschylus

The Beacon Fires

A GLEAM -- a gleam -- from Ida's height,
By the Fire-god sent, it came;
From watch to watch it leapt, that light,
As a rider rode the flame!
It shot through the startled sky,
And the torch of that blazing glory
Old Lemnos caught on high,
On its holy promontory,
And sent it on, the jocund sign,
To Athos, Mount of Jove divine.
Wildly the while, it rose from the isle,
So that the might of the journeying Light
Skimmed over the back of the gleaming brine!
Farther and faster speeds it on,
Till the watch that keeps Macistus steep
See it ...

Read the full of The Beacon Fires

Song Of The Furies

Up and lead the dance of Fate!
Lift the song that mortals hate!
Tell what rights are ours on earth,
Over all of human birth.
Swift of foot to avenge are we!
He whose hands are clean and pure,
Naught our wrath to dread hath he;
Calm his cloudless days endure.
But the man that seeks to hide