Aldous Huxley

(1894-1963 / Godalming)

Aldous Huxley Quotes

  • ''A child-like man is not a man whose development has been arrested; on the contrary, he is a man who has given himself a chance of continuing to develop long after most adults have muffled themselves in the cocoon of middle-aged habit and convention.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. repr. In Music at Night and Other Essays (1949). "Vulgarity in Literature," (1930).
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  • ''Indifference to all the refinements of life—it's really shocking. Just Calvinism, that's all. Calvinism without the excuse of Calvin's theology.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Eustace Barnack, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 12 (1944). This is Eustace Barnack's critique of his social activist brother and reflects Huxley's disenchantment with the puritanism of social reformers.
  • ''Silence is as full of potential wisdom and wit as the unhewn marble of great sculpture. The silent bear no witness against themselves.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Walter Bidlake, in Point Counter Point, ch. 1 (1928).
  • ''The philosophy of action for action, power for the sake of power, had become an established orthodoxy. "Thou has conquered, O go-getting Babbitt."''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Eustace Barnack, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 12 (1944). In this passage the narrator reports Eustace Barnack's thoughts and concludes with his reworking of Algernon Charles Swinburne's poem "An Interlude," "Thou hast conquered, O pale Galilean" substituting Sinclair Lewis's character who represents the ideology of small- town capitalism.
  • ''Speed, it seems to me, provides the one genuinely modern pleasure.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Wanted, a New Pleasure," Music at Night and Other Essays (1949).
  • ''Hell isn't merely paved with good intentions; it's walled and roofed with them. Yes, and furnished too.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Eustace Barnack, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 12 (1944). Eustace Barnack extends this time-worn aphorism to express his contempt for puritanical reformers who have traditionally used violence to install their moral and religious visions.
  • ''The philosophy of action for action, power for the sake of power, had become an established orthodoxy. "Thou has conquered, O go-getting Babbitt."''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Eustace Barnack, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 12 (1944). In this passage the narrator reports Eustace Barnack's thoughts and concludes with his reworking of Algernon Charles Swinburne's poem "An Interlude," "Thou hast conquered, O pale Galilean" substituting Sinclair Lewis's character who represents the ideology of small- town capitalism.
  • ''An ideal is merely the projection, on an enormously enlarged scale, of some aspect of personality.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. William Propter, in After Many a Summer Dies the Swan, pt. I, ch. 9 (1939).
  • ''Everyone who wants to do good to the human race always ends in universal bullying.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Eustace Barnack, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 8 (1944). Eustace Barnack's sarcasm at the expense of an American ideologue reflects Huxley's distrust of political activism.

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Best Poem of Aldous Huxley

My Firm Belief Is, That Pizarro

My firm belief is, that Pizarro
Received education at Harrow -
This alone would suffice,
To account for his vice,
And his views superstitiously narrow.

Read the full of My Firm Belief Is, That Pizarro

Vision

I had been sitting alone with books,
Till doubt was a black disease,
When I heard the cheerful shout of rooks
In the bare, prophetic trees.

Bare trees, prophetic of new birth,
You lift your branches clean and free
To be a beacon to the earth,
A flame of wrath for all to see.

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