Aldous Huxley

(1894-1963 / Godalming)

Aldous Huxley Quotes

  • ''Where beauty is worshipped for beauty's sake as a goddess, independent of and superior to morality and philosophy, the most horrible putrefaction is apt to set in. The lives of the aesthetes are the far from edifying commentary on the religion of beauty.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "The Substitutes for Religion," Proper Studies (1927).
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  • ''Bondage is the life of personality, and for bondage the personal self will fight with tireless resourcefulness and the most stubborn cunning.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. the thoughts of William Propter in After Many a Summer Dies the Swan, pt. I, ch. 8 (1939). William Propter is the moral voice of this novel, counselling reform through the application of practical mysticism and transcendence of the self.
  • ''A belief in hell and the knowledge that every ambition is doomed to frustration at the hands of a skeleton have never prevented the majority of human beings from behaving as though death were no more than an unfounded rumour.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Variations on a Baroque Tomb," Themes and Variations (1950).
  • ''De Sade is the one completely consistent and thoroughgoing revolutionary of history.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Ends and Means, ch. 14 (1937).
  • ''Man is an intelligence, not served by, but in servitude to his organs.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. "Variations on a Philosopher," Themes and Variations (1950).
  • ''So long as men worship the Caesars and Napoleons, Caesars and Napoleons will duly rise and make them miserable.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. Ends and Means, ch. 8 (1937).
  • ''Sons have always a rebellious wish to be disillusioned by that which charmed their fathers.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. repr. In Music at Night and Other Essays (1949). "Vulgarity in Literature," (1930).
  • ''Now, a corpse, poor thing, is an untouchable and the process of decay is, of all pieces of bad manners, the vulgarest imaginable. For a corpse is, by definition, a person absolutely devoid of savoir vivre.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. repr. In Music at Night and Other Essays (1949). "Vulgarity in Literature," (1930).
  • ''What with making their way and enjoying what they have won, heroes have no time to think. But the sons of heroes—ah, they have all the necessary leisure.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British author. repr. In Music at Night and Other Essays (1949). "Vulgarity in Literature," (1930).
  • ''You should hurry up ... and acquire the cigar habit. It's one of the major happinesses. And so much more lasting than love, so much less costly in emotional wear and tear.''
    Aldous Huxley (1894-1963), British novelist. Eustace Barnack, in Time Must Have a Stop, ch. 12 (1944). Eustace Barnack's witticism contains an irony of which he seems unaware. Throughout the novel, his hedonism is made apparent by his continuous sucking on cigars. It is as though he were still an unweaned infant needy for the comfort of the breast.

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Best Poem of Aldous Huxley

My Firm Belief Is, That Pizarro

My firm belief is, that Pizarro
Received education at Harrow -
This alone would suffice,
To account for his vice,
And his views superstitiously narrow.

Read the full of My Firm Belief Is, That Pizarro

Doors Of The Temple

Many are the doors of the spirit that lead
Into the inmost shrine:
And I count the gates of the temple divine,
Since the god of the place is God indeed.
And these are the gates that God decreed
Should lead to his house: - kisses and wine,
Cool depths of thought, youth without rest,
And calm old age, prayer and desire,
The lover's and mother's breast,

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