Alexander Pope

(21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744 / London / England)

Alexander Pope Quotes

  • '''Tis but a part we see, and not a whole.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''Lo, what huge heaps of littleness around!''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Moral Essays: Epistle to Richard Boyle, Earl of Burlington. . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''"Blessed is the man who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed" was the ninth beatitude.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. letter, Oct. 6, 1727, to playwright John Gay. Quoted in Roscoe, Life of Pope, vol. 10.
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  • ''Good God! how often are we to die before we go quite off this stage? In every friend we lose a part of ourselves, and the best part.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. letter, Dec. 5, 1732, to poet and author Jonathan Swift. The Correspondence of Alexander Pope, vol. 3, ed. George Sherburn (1956). Written the day after the death of playwright John Gay.
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  • ''Histories are more full of examples of the fidelity of dogs than of friends.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. letter, Oct. 19, 1709. The Correspondence of Alexander Pope, vol. 1, ed. George Sherburn (1956).
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  • ''P—xed by her love, or libeled by her hate.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The First Satire of the Second Book of Horace (l. 84). NU. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''Most women have no characters at all.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to a Lady, l. 2 (1735). Towards the end of the poem (l. 269-70), Pope writes "And yet, believe me, good as well as ill, Woman's at best a contradiction still."
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  • ''At ev'ry word a reputation dies.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. The Rape of the Lock, cto. 3, l. 16 (1714).
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  • ''Nature and nature's laws lay hid in the night. God said, Let Newton be! and all was light!''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. (Published in 1730). "Epitaph. Intended for Sir Isaac Newton, In Westminster Abbey," The Poems of Alexander Pope, ed. John Butt, Yale, New Haven (1966).
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  • ''They dream in courtship, but in wedlock wake.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. The Wife of Bath, l. 103 (1713).
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Best Poem of Alexander Pope

Summer

See what delights in sylvan scenes appear!
Descending Gods have found Elysium here.
In woods bright Venus with Adonis stray'd,
And chaste Diana haunts the forest shade.
Come lovely nymph, and bless the silent hours,
When swains from shearing seek their nightly bow'rs;
When weary reapers quit the sultry field,
And crown'd with corn, their thanks to Ceres yield.
This harmless grove no lurking viper hides,
But in my breast the serpent Love abides.
Here bees from blossoms sip the rosy dew,
But your Alexis knows no sweets but you.
Oh deign to visit ...

Read the full of Summer

The Riddle Of The World

Know then thyself, presume not God to scan
The proper study of Mankind is Man.
Placed on this isthmus of a middle state,
A Being darkly wise, and rudely great:
With too much knowledge for the Sceptic side,
With too much weakness for the Stoic's pride,
He hangs between; in doubt to act, or rest;
In doubt to deem himself a God, or Beast;
In doubt his mind and body to prefer;

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