Alexander Pope

(21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744 / London / England)

Alexander Pope Quotes

  • '''Tis but a part we see, and not a whole.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''Lo, what huge heaps of littleness around!''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Moral Essays: Epistle to Richard Boyle, Earl of Burlington. . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''"Blessed is the man who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed" was the ninth beatitude.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. letter, Oct. 6, 1727, to playwright John Gay. Quoted in Roscoe, Life of Pope, vol. 10.
  • ''Good God! how often are we to die before we go quite off this stage? In every friend we lose a part of ourselves, and the best part.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. letter, Dec. 5, 1732, to poet and author Jonathan Swift. The Correspondence of Alexander Pope, vol. 3, ed. George Sherburn (1956). Written the day after the death of playwright John Gay.
  • ''Histories are more full of examples of the fidelity of dogs than of friends.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. letter, Oct. 19, 1709. The Correspondence of Alexander Pope, vol. 1, ed. George Sherburn (1956).
  • ''P—xed by her love, or libeled by her hate.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The First Satire of the Second Book of Horace (l. 84). NU. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Most women have no characters at all.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to a Lady, l. 2 (1735). Towards the end of the poem (l. 269-70), Pope writes "And yet, believe me, good as well as ill, Woman's at best a contradiction still."
  • ''At ev'ry word a reputation dies.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. The Rape of the Lock, cto. 3, l. 16 (1714).
  • ''Nature and nature's laws lay hid in the night. God said, Let Newton be! and all was light!''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. (Published in 1730). "Epitaph. Intended for Sir Isaac Newton, In Westminster Abbey," The Poems of Alexander Pope, ed. John Butt, Yale, New Haven (1966).
  • ''They dream in courtship, but in wedlock wake.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. The Wife of Bath, l. 103 (1713).

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Best Poem of Alexander Pope

Ode On Solitude

Happy the man, whose wish and care
A few paternal acres bound,
Content to breathe his native air,
In his own ground.

Whose heards with milk, whose fields with bread,
Whose flocks supply him with attire,
Whose trees in summer yield him shade,
In winter fire.

Blest! who can unconcern'dly find
Hours, days, and years slide soft away,
In health of body, peace of mind,
Quiet by day,

Sound sleep by night; study and ease
Together mix'd; sweet ...

Read the full of Ode On Solitude

Sound And Sense

True ease in writing comes from art, not chance,
As those move easiest who have learned to dance.
'Tis not enough no harshness gives offense,
The sound must seem an echo to the sense:
Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows,
And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows;
But when loud surges lash the sounding shore,
The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar;
When Ajax strives some rock's vast weight to throw,

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