Alfred Lord Tennyson

(6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892 / Lincoln / England)

Comments about Alfred Lord Tennyson

  • David Mccann (1/29/2017 9:04:00 PM)

    For interest of those who love all things Tennyson!

    We say an “Heliographic” photo, as this is what it appears to be to us, perhaps experts in photography could be precise as to what kind of process was taken to produce this photo-like image in 1856.

    1856 is the same year Thomas Woolner sculpt this plaster cast, which is one of the best-known portrait reliefs of the poet Alfred Tennyson.

    As you can see in this listing we are selling both the “Heliographic” photo, that seems was taken for John Henry Robinson to 'copy' and create the final engraving which is also for sale as a pair.

    What is interesting is that Robinson has placed the photographic image onto stiff card – in the top left and right corners are pin holes and how he would have mounted it to work from; around the outer edge is pencil drawing and so he can complete a fine outer circle around the image, the same seems to be the case with pencil shading directly on the eyes, parts of the head and hair. – The size of this card is 13cm x 9.8cm, the image is 7cm in circumference.

    The ‘proof before letters’ stipple engraving is printed on traditional stiff paper; size 12.5cm x 10.2cm – and the image is 7.5cm in circumference.

    These extremely rare items are historic pieces of ‘art’ and rare as hens teeth. We have listed it at £350 for the pair, and should imagine were they to go to auction would sell for much higher.

    Note: We have also listed this under the 'engravings/prints' section on Etsy, whatever category it sells in first the other listing will immediately be removed.

    NOTE: All other similar engravings either on the National Portrait Gallery, The Royal Academy of Art, Victoria & Albert Museum, British Museum and commercial or private dealers are not as rare as what’s been listed here; theirs are ‘copies’, prints made after these originals. Our collection is 100% genuine and sourced directly from John Henry Robinson’s own portfolio - see further details below.

    Woolner considered it the best portrait roundel he had ever made, even though he had to adapt it to appease the poet’s wife, Emily, who requested that he shorten the nose to ennoble the profile. Tennyson’s poetry was a rich source of inspiration to the Pre-Raphaelites.

    This link shows you a ‘copy’ of what we have listed;
    http: //www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx? objectId=3667550&partId=1&searchText=John+Henry+Robinson&page=1

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  • Arya Goswami Arya Goswami (12/17/2015 5:49:00 AM)

    Ah, just unbelievable Bernie Tennyson penned a comment here. No alacrity in assuming that his blood has got the fragrance of those verses his father wrote, even if he's not so good at verses just like his father! It seems as if poetry came to Lord Tennyson just naturally as if he was just to be renowned by the glorious name 'Tennyson'!

  • Qadr Amir (12/21/2013 10:26:00 AM)

    To Bernie Tennyson: I feel honored to talk with you as Alfred Lord Tennyson is one of my favorite poets. I recommend you IN MEMORIAM as it kind a fits with your situation. It is a requiem for the poet's beloved Cambridge friend Arthur Henry Hallam, who died suddenly of a cerebral haemorrhage in Vienna in 1833.

  • Bernie Tennyson (6/26/2013 8:10:00 PM)

    I recently looked into my Family Tree as sadly my Father passed away January last gone at 56yrs young! ! My mam sadly passed 5yrs before at the age of 52yrs young. I myself is 33 years of age. I have discovered that Alfred Lord Tennyson is one of my Ancestors. My father used to write poems as a hobbie but he was great at it. I now cant stop reading his work and think its fantastic. Could anyone suggest a poem to me that i can dedicate to both my parents please. I miss them so much and would like to get it printed and framed. I have yet to read loads more, any suggestions? ? Thank you for taking the time to read this comment.

  • Julia Sawyer (6/26/2013 12:28:00 PM)

    There was a poem called To Julia on Her birthday unpublished by Alfred Lord Tennyson, I took it to Sotheby's to be sold in the70's along with other poems written by Tennysons own hand they said that it was not valuable enough, but they wouldn't return it to me, over the years I have requested it back but have had no reply from them, has anyone heard of it I believe he is referring to Julia Cameron who was the famous photographer during Tennyson's time

  • Woofwoof Ray (4/18/2013 7:06:00 AM)

    His poems are fantastic. My favourites are Break break break, Now sleeps the crimson petal (great version of this set to music in the film Vanity fair with Reese Witherspoon) , Come into the garden maud, The lady of Shallott, Crossing the bar

  • Woofwoof Ray (4/18/2013 7:05:00 AM)

    His poems are fantastic. My favourites are Break break break, Now sleeps the crimson petal (great version of this set to music in the film Vanity fair with Reese Witherspoon) , Come into the garden maud, The lady of Shallott, Crossing the bar

  • Eric Lopez (3/10/2013 11:07:00 PM)

    I was playing a video game Mass Effect, and through out the series Shepherd, and Williamson use references from Tennyson's poems. I decided to look him up and they are just amazing. I'm glad Mass effect turned me on to this guy's amazing art work.

  • Ulysses J (11/5/2012 7:46:00 PM)

    In Memoriam is pure beauty
    And I guess it's evident that I'm a fan of Ulysses, heh, mostly because I can relate well to Ulysses, flaws and all I respect the character in that poem so much, in fact it's hard to express and i get all teary when i try; _;

  • Artemis Gutierrez (9/12/2012 6:06:00 PM)

    I like his poem charge of the light brigade. For my report I wrote about this poem and Alfred Lord Tennyson.

Best Poem of Alfred Lord Tennyson

Ulysses

It little profits that an idle king,
By this still hearth, among these barren crags,
Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole
Unequal laws unto a savage race,
That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
I cannot rest from travel; I will drink
Life to the lees. All times I have enjoy'd
Greatly, have suffer'd greatly, both with those
That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when
Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades
Vext the dim sea. I am become a name;
For always roaming with a hungry heart
Much have I seen and known,-- cities of men ...

Read the full of Ulysses

After-Thought

I thought of Thee, my partner and my guide,
As being past away. -Vain sympathies!
For backward, Duddon! as I cast my eyes,
I see what was, and is, and will abide;
Still glides the Stream, and shall not cease to glide;
The Form remains, the Function never dies;
While we, the brave, the mighty, and the wise,
We Men, who in our morn of youth defied
The elements, must vanish; -be it so!

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