Alfred Lord Tennyson

(6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892 / Lincoln / England)

Alfred Lord Tennyson Poems

121. Flower In The Crannied Wall 4/8/2010
122. You Ask Me, Why, Tho' Ill At Ease 1/1/2004
123. In Memoriam 131: O Living Will That Shalt Endure 1/1/2004
124. The Passing Of Arthur 1/1/2004
125. Beauty 11/27/2014
126. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 54. Oh, Yet We Trust That Somehow Goo 1/1/2004
127. Sweet And Low 1/1/2004
128. Guinevere 1/1/2004
129. St. Agnes' Eve 1/1/2004
130. Sea Dreams 1/1/2004
131. Duet 1/1/2004
132. Merlin And Vivien 1/1/2004
133. The Miller's Daughter 1/1/2004
134. Audley Court 1/1/2004
135. Locksley Hall 1/1/2004
136. Spring 1/1/2004
137. The Coming Of Arthur 1/1/2004
138. The Higher Pantheism 1/1/2004
139. The War 4/8/2010
140. The Deserted House 1/1/2004
141. The Grandmother 1/1/2004
142. Balin And Balan 1/1/2004
143. Fatima 1/1/2004
144. Sir Galahad 1/1/2004
145. Battle Of Brunanburgh 1/1/2004
146. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 126. Love Is And Was My Lord And King 1/1/2004
147. The Holy Grail 1/1/2004
148. Morte D'Arthur 1/1/2004
149. Dedication 1/1/2004
150. Politics 4/8/2010
151. ŒNone 1/1/2004
152. The Garden 1/1/2004
153. Tithonus 1/1/2004
154. O, Were I Loved As I Desire To Be! 1/1/2004
155. The Revenge - A Ballad Of The Fleet 1/1/2004
156. Lancelot And Elaine 1/1/2004
157. The Oak 1/1/2004
158. Come Down, O Maid 1/1/2004
159. Claribel: A Melody 1/1/2004
160. Now Sleeps The Crimson Petal 1/1/2004

Comments about Alfred Lord Tennyson

  • Chris Hoare (5/22/2005 11:33:00 AM)

    there seem to be some missing words. Would the web manager please check and correct?

    54 person liked.
    54 person did not like.
Best Poem of Alfred Lord Tennyson

Ulysses

It little profits that an idle king,
By this still hearth, among these barren crags,
Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole
Unequal laws unto a savage race,
That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
I cannot rest from travel; I will drink
Life to the lees. All times I have enjoy'd
Greatly, have suffer'd greatly, both with those
That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when
Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades
Vext the dim sea. I am become a name;
For always roaming with a hungry heart
Much have I seen and known,-- cities of men ...

Read the full of Ulysses

Merlin And Vivien

A storm was coming, but the winds were still,
And in the wild woods of Broceliande,
Before an oak, so hollow, huge and old
It looked a tower of ivied masonwork,
At Merlin's feet the wily Vivien lay.

For he that always bare in bitter grudge
The slights of Arthur and his Table, Mark
The Cornish King, had heard a wandering voice,

[Report Error]