Alfred Lord Tennyson

(6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892 / Lincoln / England)

Alfred Lord Tennyson Poems

161. The Owl 1/1/2004
162. Now Sleeps The Crimson Petal 1/1/2004
163. Amphion 1/1/2004
164. Boadicea 1/1/2004
165. Beauty 11/27/2014
166. In Memoriam 16: I Envy Not In Any Moods 1/1/2004
167. Freedom 4/8/2010
168. O Beauty, Passing Beauty! 1/1/2004
169. By An Evolutionist 1/1/2004
170. Far-Far-Away 4/8/2010
171. Come Into The Garden, Maud 1/1/2004
172. Beautiful City 1/1/2004
173. The Kraken 4/8/2010
174. Audley Court 1/1/2004
175. Cradle Song 1/1/2004
176. Tears, Idle Tears 1/1/2004
177. Blow, Bugle, Blow 1/1/2004
178. Ring Out , Wild Bells 4/8/2010
179. After-Thought 1/1/2004
180. Come Not When I Am Dead 1/1/2004
181. Ask Me No More 1/1/2004
182. The Flower 1/1/2004
183. The Lady Of Shalott (1842) 1/1/2004
184. Home They Brought Her Warrior Dead 1/1/2004
185. Break, Break, Break 4/8/2010
186. ‘and Ask Ye Why These Sad Tears Stream?’ 1/1/2004
187. The Eagle 1/1/2004
188. A Farewell 1/1/2004
189. All Things Will Die 1/1/2004
190. Crossing The Bar 1/1/2004
191. Charge Of The Light Brigade 1/1/2004
192. The Brook 1/1/2004
193. Ulysses 1/1/2004

Comments about Alfred Lord Tennyson

  • Woofwoof Ray (4/18/2013 7:06:00 AM)

    His poems are fantastic. My favourites are Break break break, Now sleeps the crimson petal (great version of this set to music in the film Vanity fair with Reese Witherspoon) , Come into the garden maud, The lady of Shallott, Crossing the bar

    130 person liked.
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  • Woofwoof Ray (4/18/2013 7:05:00 AM)

    His poems are fantastic. My favourites are Break break break, Now sleeps the crimson petal (great version of this set to music in the film Vanity fair with Reese Witherspoon) , Come into the garden maud, The lady of Shallott, Crossing the bar

    114 person liked.
    85 person did not like.
  • Eric Lopez (3/10/2013 11:07:00 PM)

    I was playing a video game Mass Effect, and through out the series Shepherd, and Williamson use references from Tennyson's poems. I decided to look him up and they are just amazing. I'm glad Mass effect turned me on to this guy's amazing art work.

    103 person liked.
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  • Ulysses J (11/5/2012 7:46:00 PM)

    In Memoriam is pure beauty
    And I guess it's evident that I'm a fan of Ulysses, heh, mostly because I can relate well to Ulysses, flaws and all I respect the character in that poem so much, in fact it's hard to express and i get all teary when i try; _;

    119 person liked.
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  • Artemis Gutierrez (9/12/2012 6:06:00 PM)

    I like his poem charge of the light brigade. For my report I wrote about this poem and Alfred Lord Tennyson.

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  • Namrata Nath (8/26/2012 3:29:00 AM)

    alfred lord tennyson is a great poet. I just read The brook. It's so mesmerising the way he uses the words and sounds and everything. Please check out the poem guys. It's totally out of the world! ! !

    109 person liked.
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  • Kevin Straw Kevin Straw (6/4/2012 1:33:00 PM)

    “crookéd hands” (2 syllables) is wrong.
    “The man clasped his stick with crookéd hands.” implies hands out of shape.
    But an eagle’s “feet” are flexible to curve and have long curved claws at the end. Tennyson presumably had not seen an eagle’s feet.
    I would not say that an eagle on a mountain is “close to the sun”.
    I am not sure about “from his mountain walls” – the eagle is watching from a crag – what is the point of “walls”? “his mountain wall” would be a better metaphor denoting the perpendicularity of the crag which allows the eagle to fall “like a thunderbolt”. But the rhyme would be lost.
    Can anyone tell me if this method of hunting is used by eagles? Do they not hunt by flying and then stooping on their prey?
    The poet is trying to anthropomorphise the eagle but he does not help the poem by doing so.
    Calling the eagle “he” and giving it “hands” etc. deprives it of its savage nature reminding one of Wind in the Willows!
    But the overall rhetorical power of the poem cannot be denied.

    71 person liked.
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  • Nelson P (10/28/2011 12:38:00 PM)

    Hey folks, my band Wrong Side of Dawn wrote a song based on the words to 'Crossing the Bar' by Alfred Lord Tennyson. You can watch the Youtube video at http: //youtu.be/FjY-0p_jE1k or download the song at http: //music.wrongsideofdawn.com/track/crossing-the-bar :) Hope you enjoy it!

    74 person liked.
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  • Meshack Lebane (7/5/2011 6:19:00 AM)

    Very intersting I wish this simple words were taught at school our poets this days are
    Adicted to bid words which is distort the meaning at times! ! !

    64 person liked.
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  • Chris Hoare (5/22/2005 11:33:00 AM)

    there seem to be some missing words. Would the web manager please check and correct?

    54 person liked.
    54 person did not like.
Best Poem of Alfred Lord Tennyson

Crossing The Bar

Sunset and evening star,
And one clear call for me!
And may there be no moaning of the bar,
When I put out to sea,

But such a tide as moving seems asleep,
Too full for sound and foam,
When that which drew from out the boundless deep
Turns again home.

Twilight and evening bell,
And after that the dark!
And may there be no sadness of farewell,
When I embark;

For though from out our bourne of Time and Place
The flood may bear me far,
I hope to see my Pilot face to face
When I have crost the bar.

Read the full of Crossing The Bar

Merlin And Vivien

A storm was coming, but the winds were still,
And in the wild woods of Broceliande,
Before an oak, so hollow, huge and old
It looked a tower of ivied masonwork,
At Merlin's feet the wily Vivien lay.

For he that always bare in bitter grudge
The slights of Arthur and his Table, Mark
The Cornish King, had heard a wandering voice,