Alfred Lord Tennyson

(6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892 / Lincoln / England)

Alfred Lord Tennyson Quotes

  • ''“Tis better to have loved and lost
    Than never to have loved at all.” ''
    Alfred Lord Tennyson, In Memoriam
    181 person liked.
    33 person did not like.
  • ''“Hope
    Smiles from the threshold of the year to come,
    Whispering it will be happier...”''
    Alfred Lord Tennyson
  • ''“Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean,
    Tears from the depths of some devine despair
    Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes,
    In looking on the happy autumn fields,
    And thinking of the days that are no more.” ''
    Alfred Lord Tennyson
  • ''“Though much is taken, much abides; and though
    We are not now that strength which in old days
    Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
    One equal temper of heroic hearts,
    Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
    To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.” ''
    Alfred Lord Tennyson, Idylls of the King and a Selection of Poems
  • ''“Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers.” ''
    Alfred Lord Tennyson
  • ''“Once in a golden hour
    I cast to earth a seed.
    Up there came a flower,
    The people said, a weed.”''
    Alfred Lord Tennyson, The Complete Works of Alfred Tennyson
  • ''“Dreams are true while they last, and do we not live in dreams?” ''
    Alfred Lord Tennyson
  • ''“The words far, far away had always a strange charm.” ''
    Alfred Lord Tennyson
  • ''“Come friends, its not too late to seek a newer world.” ''
    Alfred Lord Tennyson
  • ''“Theirs not to reason why,
    Theirs but to do and die” ''
    Alfred Lord Tennyson

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of Alfred Lord Tennyson

Ulysses

It little profits that an idle king,
By this still hearth, among these barren crags,
Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole
Unequal laws unto a savage race,
That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
I cannot rest from travel; I will drink
Life to the lees. All times I have enjoy'd
Greatly, have suffer'd greatly, both with those
That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when
Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades
Vext the dim sea. I am become a name;
For always roaming with a hungry heart
Much have I seen and known,-- cities of men ...

Read the full of Ulysses

Merlin And Vivien

A storm was coming, but the winds were still,
And in the wild woods of Broceliande,
Before an oak, so hollow, huge and old
It looked a tower of ivied masonwork,
At Merlin's feet the wily Vivien lay.

For he that always bare in bitter grudge
The slights of Arthur and his Table, Mark
The Cornish King, had heard a wandering voice,

[Report Error]