Ambrose Bierce

(24 June 1842 - 26 December 1913 / Horse Cave Creek, Ohio)

Ambrose Bierce Quotes

  • ''The covers of this book are too far apart.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. Quoted in C.H. Grattan, Bitter Bierce (1929). One-sentence book review.
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  • ''A man is known by the company he organizes.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. "Saw," The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Bride. A woman with a fine prospect of happiness behind her.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Irreligion. The principal one of the great faiths of the world.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Insurrection. An unsuccessful revolution; disaffection's failure to substitute misrule for bad government.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Insurance. An ingenious modern game of chance in which the player is permitted to enjoy the comfortable conviction that he is beating the man who keeps the table.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Calamities are of two kinds: misfortune to ourselves, and good fortune to others.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906), repr. In Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, vol. 7 (1911).
  • ''Incompatibility. In matrimony a similarity of tastes, particularly the taste for domination.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Optimism. The doctrine or belief that everything is beautiful, including what is ugly.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Conservative. A statesman who is enamored of existing evils, as distinguished from a Liberal, who wishes to replace them with others.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906), repr. In Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, vol. 7 (1911).

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Best Poem of Ambrose Bierce

Alone

In contact, lo! the flint and steel,
By sharp and flame, the thought reveal
That he the metal, she the stone,
Had cherished secretly alone.

Read the full of Alone

Rimer

The rimer quenches his unheeded fires,
The sound surceases and the sense expires.
Then the domestic dog, to east and west,
Expounds the passions burning in his breast.
The rising moon o'er that enchanted land
Pauses to hear and yearns to understand.

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