Ambrose Bierce

(24 June 1842 - 26 December 1913 / Horse Cave Creek, Ohio)

Ambrose Bierce Quotes

  • ''Woman absent is woman dead.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
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  • ''Witticism. A sharp and clever remark, usually quoted and seldom noted; what the Philistine is pleased to call a "joke."''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Women in love are less ashamed than men. They have less to be ashamed of.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914?), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Erudition. Dust shaken out of a book into an empty skull.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Eulogy. Praise of a person who has either the advantages of wealth and power, or the consideration to be dead.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Wit. The salt with which the American humorist spoils his intellectual cookery by leaving it out.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Experience. The wisdom that enables us to recognise in an undesirable old acquaintance the folly that we have already embraced.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
  • ''Faith. Belief without evidence in what is told by one who speaks without knowledge, of things without parallel.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906), repr. In Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, vol. 7 (1911).
  • ''Fidelity. A virtue peculiar to those who are about to be betrayed.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906), repr. In Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, vol. 7 (1911).
  • ''Forgetfulness. A gift of God bestowed upon debtors in compensation for their destitution of conscience.''
    Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).

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Best Poem of Ambrose Bierce

Alone

In contact, lo! the flint and steel,
By sharp and flame, the thought reveal
That he the metal, she the stone,
Had cherished secretly alone.

Read the full of Alone

The Statesmen

How blest the land that counts among
Her sons so many good and wise,
To execute great feats of tongue
When troubles rise.

Behold them mounting every stump,
By speech our liberty to guard.
Observe their courage--see them jump,
And come down hard!

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