Anton Pavlovich Chekhov


Anton Pavlovich Chekhov Quotes

  • ''Death is terrifying, but it would be even more terrifying to find out that you are going to live forever and never die.''
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Complete Works and Letters in Thirty Volumes, Works, Notebook I, vol. 17, p. 67, "Nauka" (1980).
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  • ''What seems to us serious, significant and important will, in future times, be forgotten or won't seem important at all.''
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Vershinin in Three Sisters, act 1.
  • ''Everything should be first-rate in a person, his face, clothes, soul and thoughts.''
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Astrov in Uncle Vanya, act 2.
  • ''Moscow is a city that has much suffering ahead of it.''
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Yartsev in Three Years, Works, vol. 9, p. 70, "Nauka" (1976).
  • ''Those who come a hundred or two hundred years after us will despise us for having lived our lives so stupidly and tastelessly. Perhaps they'll find a means to be happy.''
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Astrov in Uncle Vanya, act 4.
  • ''A woman can only become a man's friend in three stages: first, she's an agreeable acquaintance, then a mistress, and only after that a friend.''
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian dramatist, author. Astrov, in Uncle Vanya, act 2 (1897), trans. by Elisaveta Fen (1954). Vanya (Voynitsky) replies to this, "That's a crude sort of philosophy."
  • ''Perhaps the feelings that we experience when we are in love represent a normal state. Being in love shows a person who he should be.''
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Complete Works and Letters in Thirty Volumes, Works, Notebook I, vol. 17, p. 14, "Nauka" (1980).
  • ''The more cultured a man, the less fortunate he is.''
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Complete Works and Letters in Thirty Volumes, Works, Notebook I, vol. 17, p. 46, "Nauka" (1980).
  • ''Satiation, like any state of vitality, always contains a degree of impudence, and that impudence emerges first and foremost when the sated man instructs the hungry one.''
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Letter, October 20, 1891, to his editor and friend, A.S. Suvorin. Complete Works and Letters in Thirty Volumes, Letters, vol. 4, p. 286, "Nauka" (1976).
  • ''What if something were to come of it?''
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904), Russian author, playwright. Belikov in Man in a Case, Works, vol. 10, p. 43, "Nauka" (1976). Belikov's famous line is cited by Russians to indicate paralyzing caution.

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