Benjamin Franklin King

(17 March 1857 - 7 April 1894 / St. Joseph, Michigan)

Benjamin Franklin King Quotes

  • ''Those disputing, contradicting, and confuting people are generally unfortunate in their affairs. They get victory, sometimes, but they never get good will, which would be of more use to them.''
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 9 (1868). Written 1771-1790. Earlier in his autobiography (ch. 1), describing his own "disputatious turn" when younger, a habit he had picked up from reading his father's books, Franklin observed, "Persons of good sense ... seldom fall into it, except lawyers, university men, and, generally, men of all sorts who have been bred at Edinburgh."
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  • ''A benevolent man should allow a few faults in himself, to keep his friends in countenance.''
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 6 (written 1771-1790, publ. 1868).
  • ''I should have no objection to go over the same life from its beginning to the end: requesting only the advantage authors have, of correcting in a second edition the faults of the first.''
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 1 (1868).
  • ''I have always thought that one man of tolerable abilities may work great changes, and accomplish great affairs among mankind, if he first forms a good plan, and, cutting off all amusements or other employments that would divert his attention, make the execution of that same plan his sole study and business.''
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 7 (written 1771-1790, published 1868).
  • ''Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.''
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. letter, Nov. 13, 1789. Complete Works, vol. 10, ed. John Bigelow (1887-1888).
  • ''There never was a good war or a bad peace.''
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Letter, July 27, 1783, to the botanist Sir Joseph Banks. Complete Works, vol. 8, ed. John Bigelow (1887-1888). Franklin used the same words in a letter of Sept. 11, 1783, to New England revolutionary Josiah Quincy.
  • ''Be studious in your profession, and you will be learned. Be industrious and frugal, and you will be rich. Be sober and temperate, and you will be healthy. Be in general virtuous, and you will be happy. At least you will, by such conduct, stand the best chance for such consequences.''
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. letter, Aug. 9, 1768. Complete Works, vol. 4, ed. John Bigelow (1887-1888).
  • ''We are more thoroughly an enlightened people, with respect to our political interests, than perhaps any other under heaven. Every man among us reads, and is so easy in his circumstances as to have leisure for conversations of improvement and for acquiring information.''
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. letter, Sept. 6, 1783. Complete Works, vol. 8, ed. John Bigelow (1887-1888).
  • ''Furnished as all Europe now is with Academies of Science, with nice instruments and the spirit of experiment, the progress of human knowledge will be rapid and discoveries made of which we have at present no conception. I begin to be almost sorry I was born so soon, since I cannot have the happiness of knowing what will be known a hundred years hence.''
    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Letter, July 27, 1783, to naturalist Sir Joseph Banks, president of the Royal Society. Complete Works, vol. 8, ed. John Bigelow (1887-1888).

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Best Poem of Benjamin Franklin King

The Pessimist

1 Nothing to do but work,
2 Nothing to eat but food,
3 Nothing to wear but clothes
4 To keep one from going nude.

5 Nothing to breathe but air
6 Quick as a flash 't is gone;
7 Nowhere to fall but off,
8 Nowhere to stand but on.

9 Nothing to comb but hair,
10 Nowhere to sleep but in bed,
11 Nothing to weep but tears,
12 Nothing to bury but dead.

13 Nothing to sing but songs,
14 Ah, well, alas! alack!
15 Nowhere to go but out,
16 Nowhere to come but ...

Read the full of The Pessimist

Toboggan

1 Down from the hills and over the snow
2 Swift as a meteor's flash we go,
3 Toboggan! Toboggan! Toboggan!
4 Down from the hills with our senses lost,
5 Jealous of cheeks that are kissed by the frost,
6 Toboggan! Toboggan! Toboggan!

7 With snow piled high on housetop and hill,
8 O'er frozen rivulet, river, and rill,

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