Bertrand Russell


Bertrand Russell Quotes

  • ''Science seems to be at war with itself.... Naive realism leads to physics, and physics, if true, shows naive realism to be false. Therefore naive realism, if true, is false; therefore it is false.''
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher, mathematician, activist, pacifist. An Inquiry into Meaning and Truth, p. 14 (1940).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Aristotle could have avoided the mistake of thinking that women have fewer teeth than men, by the simple device of asking Mrs. Aristotle to keep her mouth open while he counted.''
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher, mathematician. "An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish," Unpopular Essays (1950).
  • ''Whatever we know without inference is mental.''
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British professor of philosophy (Cambridge University). Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits, p. 224, Simon and Schuster (1948).
  • ''In America everybody is of opinion that he has no social superiors, since all men are equal, but he does not admit that he has no social inferiors.''
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher, mathematician. "Ideas That Have Harmed Mankind," ch. 10, Unpopular Essays (1950).
  • ''I remain convinced that obstinate addiction to ordinary language in our private thoughts is one of the main obstacles to progress in philosophy.''
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher, mathematician, activist, pacifist. Library of Living Philosophers: The Philosophy of Bertrand Russell, p. 694, ed. P. Schilpp (1944). One of the author's many expressions of his preference for an ideal or logically perfect language over ordinary language.
  • ''To understand a name you must be acquainted with the particular of which it is a name.''
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher. Logic and Knowledge, "The Philosophy of Logical Atomism," p. 205, Allen & Unwin (1956).
  • ''Obscenity is whatever happens to shock some elderly and ignorant magistrate.''
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher, mathematician. Look (New York, Feb. 23, 1954).
  • ''Mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true.''
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher, mathematician. Article first published in International Monthly, vol. 4 (1901). Mysticism and Logic, ch. 4 (1917). In a letter of March 1912 to Lady Ottoline Morrell, Russell wrote: "I like mathematics because it is not human and has nothing particular to do with this planet or with the whole accidental universe—because, like Spinoza's God, it won't love us in return."
  • ''Liberty is the right to do what I like; license, the right to do what you like.''
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher, mathematician. "Newly Discovered Maxims of La Rochefoucauld," Fact and Fiction, Simon & Schuster (1961).
  • ''Religions, which condemn the pleasures of sense, drive men to seek the pleasures of power. Throughout history power has been the vice of the ascetic.''
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), British philosopher, mathematician. New York Herald-Tribune Magazine (May 6, 1938).

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]