Blaise Pascal


Blaise Pascal Quotes

  • ''We run carelessly to the precipice, after we have put something before us to prevent us seeing it.''
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 183 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
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  • ''We run heedlessly into the abyss after putting something in front of us to stop us seeing it.''
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 166, eds. Krailsheimer and Brunschvicg (1670).
  • ''Between us and heaven or hell there is only life, which is the frailest thing in the world.''
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 213 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • ''The great mass of people judge well of things, for they are in natural ignorance, which is man's true state.''
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 327 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • ''As men are not able to fight against death, misery, ignorance, they have taken it into their heads, in order to be happy, not to think of them at all.''
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 168 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • ''Men often take their imagination for their heart; and they believe they are converted as soon as they think of being converted.''
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 275 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • ''Concupiscence and force are the source of all our actions; concupiscence causes voluntary actions, force involuntary ones.''
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 334 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).
  • ''Animals do not admire each other. A horse does not admire its companion.''
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. Pensées, no. 685, ed. Krailsheimer, no. 401, ed. Brunschvicg (1670).
  • ''Continuous eloquence wearies.... Grandeur must be abandoned to be appreciated. Continuity in everything is unpleasant. Cold is agreeable, that we may get warm.''
    Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), French scientist, philosopher. repr. Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago (1952). Pensées, no. 355 (1670), trans. J.M. Dent & Sons, London (1931).

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