Catherine Esther Beecher

(1800-1878 / East Hampton, New York)

Catherine Esther Beecher Quotes

  • ''As if reasoning were any kind of writing or talking which tends to convince people that some doctrine or measure is true and right.''
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator, writer. "An Address to the Christian Women of America," Woman Suffrage and Women's Professions (1871).
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  • ''The great want of our race is perfect educators to train new-born minds, who are infallible teachers of what is right and true.''
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator and author. As quoted in Catherine Beecher, ch. 17, by Kathryn Kish Sklar (1973). Written in 1857.
  • ''I have inspected the accommodations and find them entirely satisfactory, and as for those young men, who are of appropriate ages to be my grandsons, they will not trouble me in the least.''
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator and author. As quoted in Catherine Beecher, ch. 18, by Kathryn Kish Sklar (1973). While in her seventies, Beecher decided to take a course at Cornell University, then an all-male institution. President Andrew D. White explained to her that there were no dormitories for women; this was Beecher's response. She stayed in the men's dorm and "enjoyed the course."
  • ''As liberty and intelligence have increased the people have more and more revolted against the theological dogmas that contradict common sense and wound the tenderest sensibilities of the soul.''
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator and author. As quoted in Catherine Beecher, ch. 18, by Kathryn Kish Sklar (1973). Written in 1864.
  • ''We now come to the grand law of the system in which we are placed, as it has been developed by the experience of our race, and that, in one word, is SACRIFICE!''
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator and author. Common Sense Applied to Religion, or the Bible and the People, ch. 4 (1857).
  • ''... the history of the race, from infancy through its stages of barbarism, heathenism, civilization, and Christianity, is a process of suffering, as the lower principles of humanity are gradually subjected to the higher.''
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator and author. Common Sense Applied to Religion, or the Bible and the People, ch. 4 (1857).
  • ''... all education must be unsound which does not propose for itself some object; and the highest of all objects must be that of living a life in accordance with God's Will.''
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator and author. Principles of Education, Drawn from Nature and Revelation, and Applied to Female Education i the Upper Classes, ch. 32 (1866).
  • ''How many young hearts have revealed the fact that what they had been trained to imagine the highest earthly felicity was but the beginning of care, disappointment, and sorrow, and often led to the extremity of mental and physical suffering.''
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator, writer. "Statistics of Female Health," Woman Suffrage and Women's Professions (1871).
  • ''The delicate and infirm go for sympathy, not to the well and buoyant, but to those who have suffered like themselves.''
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator, writer. "Statistics of Female Health," Woman Suffrage and Women's Professions (1871).
  • ''In civil and political affairs, American women take no interest or concern, except so far as they sympathize with their family and personal friends; but in all cases, in which they do feel a concern, their opinions and feelings have a consideration, equal or even superior, to that of the other sex.''
    Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878), U.S. educator and author. Treatise on Domestic Economy for the Use of Young Ladies at Home and at School, ch. 3 (1843). In later years, as the woman suffrage movement formed and gained strength, Beecher would not sympathize with it.

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