Charles Horton Cooley

(1864_1929 / Ann Arbor, Michigan)

Charles Horton Cooley Quotes

  • ''The idea that seeing life means going from place to place and doing a great variety of obvious things is an illusion natural to dull minds.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 4 (1902).
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  • ''There is hardly any one so insignificant that he does not seem imposing to some one at some time.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 9 (1902).
  • ''A man may lack everything but tact and conviction and still be a forcible speaker; but without these nothing will avail.... Fluency, grace, logical order, and the like, are merely the decorative surface of oratory.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 9 (1902).
  • ''If we divine a discrepancy between a man's words and his character, the whole impression of him becomes broken and painful; he revolts the imagination by his lack of unity, and even the good in him is hardly accepted.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 9 (1902).
  • ''Each man must have his "I;" it is more necessary to him than bread; and if he does not find scope for it within the existing institutions he will be likely to make trouble.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).
  • ''When we hate a person, with an intimate, imaginative, human hatred, we enter into his mind, or sympathize—any strong interest will arouse the imagination and create some sort of sympathy.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 4 (1902).
  • ''Every general increase of freedom is accompanied by some degeneracy, attributable to the same causes as the freedom.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 12 (1902).
  • ''No matter what a man does, he is not fully sane or human unless there is a spirit of freedom in him, a soul unconfined by purpose and larger than the practicable world.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).
  • ''We are ashamed to seem evasive in the presence of a straightforward man, cowardly in the presence of a brave one, gross in the eyes of a refined one, and so on. We always imagine, and in imagining share, the judgments of the other mind.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).
  • ''To have no heroes is to have no aspiration, to live on the momentum of the past, to be thrown back upon routine, sensuality, and the narrow self.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 8 (1902).

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