Charles Horton Cooley

(1864_1929 / Ann Arbor, Michigan)

Charles Horton Cooley Quotes

  • ''The need to exert power, when thwarted in the open fields of life, is the more likely to assert itself in trifles.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).
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  • ''Kindliness seems to exist primarily as an animal instinct, so deeply rooted that mental degeneracy, which works from the top down, does not destroy it until the mind sinks to the lower grades of idiocy.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 4 (1902).
  • ''As social beings we live with our eyes upon our reflection, but have no assurance of the tranquillity of the waters in which we see it.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).
  • ''The imaginations which people have of one another are the solid facts of society.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 3 (1902).
  • ''The chief misery of the decline of the faculties, and a main cause of the irritability that often goes with it, is evidently the isolation, the lack of customary appreciation and influence, which only the rarest tact and thoughtfulness on the part of others can alleviate.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).
  • ''There is nothing less to our credit than our neglect of the foreigner and his children, unless it be the arrogance most of us betray when we set out to "americanize" him.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).
  • ''Could anything be more indicative of a slight but general insanity than the aspect of the crowd on the streets of Chicago?''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 2 (1902).
  • ''So far as discipline is concerned, freedom means not its absence but the use of higher and more rational forms as contrasted with those that are lower or less rational.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 12 (1902).
  • ''We are born to action; and whatever is capable of suggesting and guiding action has power over us from the first.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 9 (1902).
  • ''The mind is not a hermit's cell, but a place of hospitality and intercourse.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 3 (1902).

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