Charles Horton Cooley

(1864_1929 / Ann Arbor, Michigan)

Charles Horton Cooley Quotes

  • ''By recognizing a favorable opinion of yourself, and taking pleasure in it, you in a measure give yourself and your peace of mind into the keeping of another, of whose attitude you can never be certain. You have a new source of doubt and apprehension.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).
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  • ''The bashful are always aggressive at heart.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).
  • ''Institutions—government, churches, industries, and the like—have properly no other function than to contribute to human freedom; and in so far as they fail, on the whole, to perform this function, they are wrong and need reconstruction.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 12 (1902).
  • ''If love closes, the self contracts and hardens: the mind having nothing else to occupy its attention and give it that change and renewal it requires, busies itself more and more with self-feeling, which takes on narrow and disgusting forms, like avarice, arrogance and fatuity.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).
  • ''The literature of the inner life is very largely a record of struggle with the inordinate passions of the social self.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).
  • ''We have no higher life that is really apart from other people. It is by imagining them that our personality is built up; to be without the power of imagining them is to be a low-grade idiot.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 3 (1902).
  • ''The passion of self-aggrandizement is persistent but plastic; it will never disappear from a vigorous mind, but may become morally higher by attaching itself to a larger conception of what constitutes the self.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).
  • ''The more developed sexual passion, in both sexes, is very largely an emotion of power, domination, or appropriation. There is no state of feeling that says "mine, mine," more fiercely.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 5 (1902).
  • ''To get away from one's working environment is, in a sense, to get away from one's self; and this is often the chief advantage of travel and change.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).
  • ''One of the great reasons for the popularity of strikes is that they give the suppressed self a sense of power. For once the human tool knows itself a man, able to stand up and speak a word or strike a blow.''
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), U.S. sociologist. Human Nature and the Social Order, ch. 6 (1902).

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