Charles Sanders Peirce

(1839_1914 / Cambridge, Massachusetts)

Charles Sanders Peirce Quotes

  • ''Doubt is an uneasy and dissatisfied state from which we struggle to free ourselves and pass into the state of belief; while the latter is a calm and satisfactory state which we do not wish to avoid, or to change to a belief in anything else.''
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. Originally published in Popular Science Monthly (1877). "The Fixation of Belief," Collected Papers, vol. 5, para. 371, Harvard University Press (1934).
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  • ''It is impossible not to envy the man who can dismiss reason, although we know how it must turn out at last.''
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. Originally published in Popular Science Monthly (1877). "The Fixation of Belief," Collected Papers, vol. 5, para. 386, Harvard University Press (1934).
  • ''Fate then is that necessity by which a certain result will surely be brought to pass according to the natural course of events however we may vary the particular circumstances which precede the event.''
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. "The Logic of 1873," Collected Papers, vol. 7, para. 334, Harvard University Press (1934).
  • ''Theology, I am persuaded, derives its initial impulse from a religious wavering; for there is quite as much, or more, that is mysterious and calculated to awaken scientific curiosity in the intercourse with God, and it [is] a problem quite analogous to that of theology.''
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. Manuscript written 1898. "The Logic of Events," Collected Papers, vol. 6, para. 3, Harvard University Press (1934).
  • ''A true proposition is a proposition belief which would never lead to such disappointment so long as the proposition is not understood otherwise than it was intended.''
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. Originally published in Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology, vol. 2 (1901). "Truth and Falsity and Error," Collected Papers, vol. 5, para. 569, Harvard University Press (1934).
  • ''Whenever a man acts purposively, he acts under a belief in some experimental phenomenon. Consequently, the sum of the experimental phenomena that a proposition implies makes up its entire bearing upon human conduct.''
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. Originally published in The Monist (1905). "What Pragmatism Is," Collected Papers, vol. 5, para. 427, Harvard University Press (1934).
  • ''Generality is, indeed, an indispensable ingredient of reality; for mere individual existence or actuality without any regularity whatever is a nullity. Chaos is pure nothing.''
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. Originally published in The Monist (1905). "What Pragmatism Is," Collected Papers, vol. 5, para. 431, Harvard University Press (1934).
  • ''Still, it will sometimes strike a scientific man that the philosophers have been less intent on finding out what the facts are, than on inquiring what belief is most in harmony with their system.''
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. Originally published in Popular Science Monthly (1878). Collected Papers, vol. 5, para. 406, Harvard University Press (1934).
  • ''The opinion which is fated to be ultimately agreed to by all who investigate, is what we mean by the truth, and the object represented in this opinion is the real. That is the way I would explain reality.''
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. Originally published in Popular Science Monthly (1878). Collected Papers, vol. 5, para. 408, Harvard University Press (1934).
  • ''Every new concept first comes to the mind in a judgment.''
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914), U.S. philosopher, logician. Fragment written c. 1908. Collected Papers, vol. 5, para. 546, Harvard University Press (1934).

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