Edgar Allan Poe

(19 January 1809 - 7 October 1849 / Boston)

Edgar Allan Poe Quotes

  • ''Nor will this overwhelming tendency to do wrong for wrong's sake, admit of analysis, or resolution into ulterior elements. It is a radical, a primitive impulse—elementary.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Imp of the Perverse," Graham's Magazine (1845). Perverseness contradictorily manifesting murder, confession, and repression.
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  • ''There might be a class of beings, human once, but now to humanity invisible, for whose scrutiny, and for whose refined appreciation of the beautiful, more especially than for our own, had been set in order by God the great landscape-garden of the whole earth.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Landscape Garden," Ladies Companion (1842). Dreaming of communion with superior beings.
  • ''Think ... before the words—the vows are spoken, which put yet another terrible bar between us.... I call upon you in the name of God ... to be sincere with me—Can you, my Annie, bear to think I am another's?''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The Letters of Edgar Allan Poe, letter, November 16, 1848, to Annie Richmond, ed. John Ward Ostrom (1966). To Annie Richmond on the eve of his planned marriage to Elmira Shelton.
  • ''In writing these Tales ... at long intervals, I have kept the book-unity always in mind ... with reference to its effect as part of a whole.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The Letters of Edgar Allan Poe, letter, August 9, 1846, to Philip P. Cooke, ed. John Ward Ostrom (1966). Unity of self and art: Poe's overriding goal.
  • ''My love—my faith—should instil into your bosom a praeternatural calm. You would rest from care.... You would get better.... And if not, Helen,... if you died—then at least would I clasp your dear hand in death, and willingly—oh, joyfully ... go down with you into the night of the Grave.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The Letters of Edgar Allan Poe, letter, October 1, 1848, to Sarah Helen Whitman, ed. John Ward Ostrom (1966). Wooing surrogates of his deceased mother.
  • ''The history of all Magazines shows plainly that those which have attained celebrity were indebted for it to articles similar in natureto Berenice—although, I grant you, far superior in style and execution. I say similar in nature. You ask me in what does this nature consist? In the ludicrous heightened into the grotesque: the fearful coloured into the horrible: the witty exaggerated into the burlesque: the singular wrought out into the strange and mystical.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The Letters of Edgar Allan Poe, letter, April 30, 1835, to Thomas W. White, ed. John Ward Ostrom (1966). Current literary fashions fueling and rationalizing Poe's attraction to the grotesque.
  • ''Imperceptibly the love of these dischords grew upon me as my love of music grew stronger.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The Letters of Edgar Allan Poe, letter, December 1, 1835, to Beverly Tucker, ed. John Ward Ostrom (1966). The poetics of atonality.
  • ''During these fits of absolute unconsciousness I drank, God only knows how often or how much. As a matter of course, my enemies referred the insanity to the drink rather than the drink to the insanity. I had indeed, nearly abandoned all hope of a permanent cure when I found one in the death of my wife.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The Letters of Edgar Allan Poe, letter, January 4, 1848, to George W. Eveleth, ed. John Ward Ostrom (1966). Poe's life-long battles with alcohol and melancholia.
  • ''You need not attempt to shake off or to banter off Romance. It is an evil you will never get rid of to the end of your days. It is a part of yourself ... of your soul. Age will only mellow it a little, and give it a holier tone.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The Letters of Edgar Allan Poe, letter, September 21, 1839, to Philip P. Cooke, ed. John Ward Ostrom (1966). Romance, embraced and transfigured.
  • ''Men die nightly in their beds, wringing the hands of ghostly confessors ... on account of the hideousness of mysteries which will not suffer themselves to be revealed.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Published simultaneously in The Casket. "The Man of the Crowd," Gentleman's Magazine (1840). Aborted confessions, the main theme in Poe's fiction and poetry.

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Best Poem of Edgar Allan Poe

Annabel Lee

It was many and many a year ago,
In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of ANNABEL LEE;
And this maiden she lived with no other thought
Than to love and be loved by me.

I was a child and she was a child,
In this kingdom by the sea;
But we loved with a love that was more than love-
I and my Annabel Lee;
With a love that the winged seraphs of heaven
Coveted her and me.

And this was the reason that, long ago,
In ...

Read the full of Annabel Lee

To Helen - 1848

I saw thee once- once only- years ago:
I must not say how many- but not many.
It was a July midnight; and from out
A full-orbed moon, that, like thine own soul, soaring,
Sought a precipitate pathway up through heaven,
There fell a silvery-silken veil of light,
With quietude, and sultriness, and slumber,
Upon the upturned faces of a thousand
Roses that grew in an enchanted garden,

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