Edgar Allan Poe

(19 January 1809 - 7 October 1849 / Boston)

Edgar Allan Poe Quotes

  • ''The prince had provided all the appliances of pleasure ...: buffoons,... improvisatori,... ballet-dancers,... musicians,... Beauty,... wine. All these and security were within. Without was the "Red Death."''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Masque of the Red Death," Graham's Magazine (1842). Illusions mobilized to oppose the death instinct.
    28 person liked.
    12 person did not like.
  • ''As the strong man exults in his physical ability, delighting in such exercises as call his muscles into action, so glories the analyst in that moral activity which disentangles.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841).
    31 person liked.
    12 person did not like.
  • ''It will be found, in fact, that the ingenious are always fanciful, and the truly imaginative never otherwise than analytic.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841).
    34 person liked.
    13 person did not like.
  • ''The best chess-player in Christendom may be little more than the best player of chess; but proficiency in whist implies capacity for success in all these more important undertakings where mind struggles with mind.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841).
    14 person liked.
    13 person did not like.
  • ''In criticism I will be bold, and as sternly, absolutely just with friend and foe. From this purpose nothing shall turn me.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. letter, Jan. 17, 1841.
    21 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''Observing him in these moods, I often dwelt meditatively upon the old philosophy of the Bi-Part Soul, and amused myself with the fancy of a double Dupin—the creative and the resolvent.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Murders of the Rue Morgue," Graham's Magazine (1841). Idealizing mental disintegration.
    6 person liked.
    4 person did not like.
  • ''The Bostonians are really, as a race, far inferior in point of anything beyond mere intellect to any other set upon the continent of North America. They are decidedly the most servile imitators of the English it is possible to conceive.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. letter, Feb. 14, 1849.
    10 person liked.
    7 person did not like.
  • ''In the one instance, the dreamer ... loses sight of this object in a wilderness of deductions and suggestions ... until ... he finds the incitamentum, or first cause of his musings,... forgotten. In my case, the primary object was invariably frivolous, although assuming, through the medium of my distempered vision, a refracted and unreal importance.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The narrator, in "Berenice," Southern Literary Messenger (1835). Suggestive of the elusive connections between madness and reason in Poe's writings.
    6 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''Is all that we see or seem
    But a dream within a dream?''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. A Dream within a Dream (l. 12-13). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.
    16 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''"There is no exquisite beauty," says Bacon, Lord Verulam, speaking truly of all the forms and genera of beauty, "without some strangeness in the proportion."''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The narrator, in "Ligeia," American Museum (1838). The strange foreshadowing the devolution of beauty into the grotesque.
    8 person liked.
    3 person did not like.

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Best Poem of Edgar Allan Poe

The Raven

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
''Tis some visitor,' I muttered, 'tapping at my chamber door-
Only this, and nothing more.'

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December,
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow;- vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books ...

Read the full of The Raven

Serenade

So sweet the hour, so calm the time,
I feel it more than half a crime,
When Nature sleeps and stars are mute,
To mar the silence ev'n with lute.
At rest on ocean's brilliant dyes
An image of Elysium lies:
Seven Pleiades entranced in Heaven,
Form in the deep another seven:
Endymion nodding from above

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