Edgar Allan Poe

(19 January 1809 - 7 October 1849 / Boston)

Edgar Allan Poe Quotes

  • ''There the traveler meets, aghast,
    Sheeted memories of the past—
    Shrouded forms that start and sigh
    As they pass the wanderer by—
    White-robed forms of friends long given,
    In agony, to the earth—and heaven.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Dream-Land (l. 33-38). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.
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  • ''In spite of the air of fable ... the public were still not at all disposed to receive it as fable. I thence concluded that the facts of my narrative would prove of such a nature as to carry with them sufficient evidence of their own authenticity.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. The narrator's preface, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, Harper and Brothers (1838). Experimenting with verisimilitude in the creation of hoaxes and fiction.
  • ''"Over the mountains
    Of the moon,
    Down the valley of the shadow,
    Ride, boldly ride,"
    The shade replied,—
    "If you seek for Eldorado!"''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Eldorado (l. 19-24). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • ''The death ... of a beautiful woman, is unquestionably the most poetical topic in the world.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Philosophy of Composition," Graham's Magazine (1846). Reflecting on memories of his dying mother.
  • ''Gaily bedight,
    A gallant knight,
    In sunshine and in shadow,
    Had journeyed long,
    Singing a song,
    In search of Eldorado.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. poet. Eldorado (l. 1-6). . . Complete Poems and Selected Essays [Edgar Allan Poe]. Richard Gray, ed. (1993) Everyman.
  • ''Mournful and never-ending remembrance.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1845), U.S. poet, critic, short-story writer. Selected Writings, ed. David Galloway (1967). The Philosophy of Composition, Graham's Magazine (Philadelphia, April 1846). Explaining the symbolism of the bird in Poe's poem The Raven. The phrase was taken as the title of Kenneth Silverman's study of Poe (1992).
  • ''If I venture to displace ... the microscopical speck of dust... on the point of my finger,... I have done a deed which shakes the Moon in her path, which causes the Sun to be no longer the Sun, and which alters forever the destiny of multitudinous myriads of stars.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Eureka, George P. Putnam (1848). Prefiguring the "butterfly effect."
  • ''Let us dismiss, as irrelevant to the poem per se, the circumstance ... which, in the first place, gave rise to the intention of composing a poem that should suit at once the popular and the critical taste.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Philosophy of Composition," Graham's Magazine (1846). Disingenuously dismissing private motives.
  • ''"We should have to be God ourselves!"MWith a phrase so startling as this yet ringing in my ears, I nevertheless venture to demand if this our present ignorance of the Deity is an ignorance to which the soul is everlastingly condemned.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. Eureka, George P. Putnam (1848). Prohibitions firing ambition.
  • ''He must be theory-mad beyond redemption who ... shall ... persist in attempting to reconcile the obstinate oils and waters of Poetry and Truth.''
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), U.S. author. "The Poetic Principle," Sartain's (1850). Self-division precipitating disintegration.

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Best Poem of Edgar Allan Poe

Annabel Lee

It was many and many a year ago,
In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of ANNABEL LEE;
And this maiden she lived with no other thought
Than to love and be loved by me.

I was a child and she was a child,
In this kingdom by the sea;
But we loved with a love that was more than love-
I and my Annabel Lee;
With a love that the winged seraphs of heaven
Coveted her and me.

And this was the reason that, long ago,
In ...

Read the full of Annabel Lee

Serenade

So sweet the hour, so calm the time,
I feel it more than half a crime,
When Nature sleeps and stars are mute,
To mar the silence ev'n with lute.
At rest on ocean's brilliant dyes
An image of Elysium lies:
Seven Pleiades entranced in Heaven,
Form in the deep another seven:
Endymion nodding from above

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