Edmund Burke

(1729_1797 / Dublin)

Edmund Burke Quotes

  • ''The tyranny of a multitude is a multiplied tyranny.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. letter, Feb. 26, 1790.
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  • ''A nation is not conquered which is perpetually to be conquered.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech, March 22, 1775. On conciliation with America.
  • ''An event has happened, upon which it is difficult to speak, and impossible to be silent.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech, May 5, 1789, Westminster Hall, London, at the impeachment of Warren Hastings.
  • ''They defend their errors as if they were defending their inheritance.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. speech, Feb. 11, 1780, to the House of Commons.
  • ''The true danger is when liberty is nibbled away, for expedience, and by parts.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letter, April 3, 1777, to the sheriffs of Bristol.
  • ''The arrogance of age must submit to be taught by youth.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letter, July 29, 1782, to author Fanny Burney.
  • ''Mere parsimony is not economy.... Expense, and great expense, may be an essential part in true economy.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. A Letter to a Noble Lord (1796), repr. In Works, vol. 5 (1899).
  • ''The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Attributed. Ascribed in various forms to Burke, though never found in his writings. Possibly it is a distillation of the words found in Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents (1770): see Burke on alliances.
  • ''A good parson once said that where mystery begins religion ends. Cannot I say, as truly at least, of human laws, that where mystery begins justice ends?''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. A Vindication of Natural Society (1756), repr. In Works, vol. 1 (1865).
  • ''It is, generally, in the season of prosperity that men discover their real temper, principles, and designs.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Published in The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, vol. 9, ed. Paul Langford (1991). First Letter on a Regicide Peace (1796).

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