Edmund Burke

(1729_1797 / Dublin)

Edmund Burke Quotes

  • ''To tax and to please, no more than to love and to be wise, is not given to men.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech, April 19, 1774, House of Commons, London. First Speech on Conciliation with America: American Taxation, Works, vol. 2 (1899).
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  • ''It is the nature of all greatness not to be exact.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech, April 19, 1774, House of Commons, London. First Speech on Conciliation with America: American Taxation, Works, vol. 2 (1899).
  • ''Manners are of more importance than laws.... Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensible operation, like that of the air we breathe in.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letters on a Regicide Peace, letter 1 (1796).
  • ''Ambition can creep as well as soar.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letters on a Regicide Peace, letter 3 (1797), repr. In Works, vol. 5 (1899).
  • ''We must not always judge of the generality of the opinion by the noise of the acclamation.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letters on a Regicide Peace, letter 1 (1796), repr. In The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, vol. 9, ed. Paul Langford (1991).
  • ''To innovate is not to reform.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letter to a Noble Lord (1796), repr. In Works, vol. 5 (1899).
  • ''Among a people generally corrupt, liberty cannot long exist.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letter to the Sheriffs of Bristol, April 3, 1777, repr. In Works, vol. 2 (1899).
  • ''If the people are happy, united, wealthy, and powerful, we presume the rest. We conclude that to be good from whence good is derived.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790).
  • ''When the leaders choose to make themselves bidders at an auction of popularity, their talents, in the construction of the state, will be of no service. They will become flatterers instead of legislators; the instruments, not the guides, of the people.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790).
  • ''Nobility is a graceful ornament to the civil order. It is the Corinthian capital of polished society.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790), repr. In Works, vol. 3 (1865).

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