Edmund Burke

(1729_1797 / Dublin)

Edmund Burke Quotes

  • ''It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for its welfare.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. "The Present State of the Nation," Observations on a Publication (1769).
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  • ''Nothing is so fatal to religion as indifference which is, at least, half infidelity.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. letter, Jan. 29, 1795. The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, vol. 9, ed. Paul Langford (1991).
  • ''The great must submit to the dominion of prudence and of virtue, or none will long submit to the dominion of the great.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letter, May 26, 1795. The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, vol. 9, ed. Paul Langford (1991).
  • ''Under the pressure of the cares and sorrows of our mortal condition, men have at all times, and in all countries, called in some physical aid to their moral consolations—wine, beer, opium, brandy, or tobacco.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Thoughts and Details on Scarcity, vol. 5, Works (Nov. 1795).
  • ''When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall, one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Speech, April 23, 1770. Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents, repr. In Works, vol. 1 (1865). Arguing the need for political parties.
  • ''We must soften into a credulity below the milkiness of infancy to think all men virtuous. We must be tainted with a malignity truly diabolical, to believe all the world to be equally wicked and corrupt.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, politician. Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents (1770).
  • ''The cold neutrality of an impartial judge.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. To His Constituents, "Translator's Preface," J.P. Brissot (1794).
  • ''Laws, like houses, lean on one another.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Tracts Relating to Poperty Laws, ch. 3, pt. 1 (1765), repr. In The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, vol. 9, ed. Paul Langford (1991).
  • ''It is the interest of the commercial world that wealth should be found everywhere.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Letter, April 23, 1778, to Samuel Span Esq. Works, vol. 2 (1865).
  • ''And having looked to government for bread, on the very first scarcity they will turn and bite the hand that fed them. To avoid that evil, government will redouble the causes of it; and then it will become inveterate and incurable.''
    Edmund Burke (1729-1797), Irish philosopher, statesman. Works, vol. 5 (Nov. 1795). Cautioning against the "attempt to feed the people out of the hands of the magistrates."

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