Edmund Spenser

(1552 - 13 January 1599 / London / England)

Edmund Spenser Poems

81. Sonnet Lxxvii 12/31/2002
82. Sonnet X 12/31/2002
83. Sonnet Lix 12/31/2002
84. Poem 16 12/31/2002
85. Poem 2 12/31/2002
86. Poem 3 12/31/2002
87. Sonnet V 12/31/2002
88. Poem 13 12/31/2002
89. Colin Clouts Come Home Againe 4/7/2010
90. Sonnet Xl 12/31/2002
91. Poem 22 12/31/2002
92. Poem 18 12/31/2002
93. Poem 17 12/31/2002
94. Poem 15 12/31/2002
95. Sonnet Lxxxi 12/31/2002
96. Poem 7 12/31/2002
97. Poem 20 12/31/2002
98. The Faerie Qveene 4/7/2010
99. Sonnet Lvi 12/31/2002
100. And Is There Care In Heaven, And Is There Love 4/7/2010
101. An Hymne Of Heavenly Love 4/7/2010
102. Sonnet Xlvii 12/31/2002
103. Sonnet Xxi 12/31/2002
104. Sonnet Lxxx 12/31/2002
105. Poem 10 12/31/2002
106. Sonnet Xxii 12/31/2002
107. Sonnet Lxx 12/31/2002
108. Sonnet Lxviii 12/31/2002
109. Sonnet Xlvi 12/31/2002
110. Poem 4 12/31/2002
111. Sonnet Xxvi 12/31/2002
112. Sonnet Li 12/31/2002
113. Muiopotmos, Or The Fate Of The Butterflie 4/7/2010
114. Sonnet Lviii By Her That Is Most Assured To Her Selfe 12/31/2002
115. From 'Daphnaida' 1/4/2003
116. Sonnet Ii 12/31/2002
117. Sonnet Xii 12/31/2002
118. Sonnet Xi 12/31/2002
119. Sonnet Lxxxvi 12/31/2002
120. Sonnet Lxix 12/31/2002
Best Poem of Edmund Spenser

My Love Is Like To Ice

My love is like to ice, and I to fire:
How comes it then that this her cold so great
Is not dissolved through my so hot desire,
But harder grows the more I her entreat?
Or how comes it that my exceeding heat
Is not allayed by her heart-frozen cold,
But that I burn much more in boiling sweat,
And feel my flames augmented manifold?
What more miraculous thing may be told,
That fire, which all things melts, should harden ice,
And ice, which is congeal's with senseless cold,
Should kindle fire by wonderful device?
Such is the power of love in gentle ...

Read the full of My Love Is Like To Ice

Sonnet Lxvi

TO all those happy blessings which ye haue,
with plenteous hand by heauen vpon you thrown:
this one disparagement they to you gaue,
that ye your loue lent to so meane a one.
Yee whose high worths surpassing paragon,
could not on earth haue found one fit for mate,
ne but in heauen matchable to none,
why did ye stoup vnto so lowly state.
But ye thereby much greater glory gate,

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