Edward Dahlberg

(1900_1977 / Boston, Massachusetts)

Edward Dahlberg Quotes

  • ''The ruin of the human heart is self-interest, which the American merchant calls self-service. We have become a self- service populace, and all our specious comforts—the automatic elevator, the escalator, the cafeteria—are depriving us of volition and moral and physical energy.''
    Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "No Love and No Thanks," Alms for Oblivion (1964).
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  • ''What has a writer to be bombastic about? Whatever good a man may write is the consequence of accident, luck, or surprise, and nobody is more surprised than an honest writer when he makes a good phrase or says something truthful.''
    Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "No Love and No Thanks," Alms for Oblivion (1964).
  • ''When one realizes that his life is worthless he either commits suicide or travels.''
    Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "On Futility," Reasons of the Heart (1965).
  • ''Man hoards himself when he has nothing to give away.''
    Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "On Love and Friendship," Reasons of the Heart (1965).
  • ''One of the weaknesses in the cooperative is that it has never been sufficiently leavened by the imagination. This is a quick-silver faculty, and likely to be a cause of worry to any collective settlement.''
    Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "Our Vanishing Cooperative Colonies," Alms for Oblivion (1964).
  • ''The Americans have always been food, sex, and spirit revivalists.''
    Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "Our Vanishing Cooperative Colonies," Alms for Oblivion (1964).
  • ''Everything ultimately fails, for we die, and that is either the penultimate failure or our most enigmatical achievement.''
    Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "Our Vanishing Cooperative Colonies," Alms for Oblivion (1964).
  • ''The newspaper has debauched the American until he is a slavish, simpering, and angerless citizen; it has taught him to be a lump mass-man toward fraud, simony, murder, and lunacies more vile than those of Commodus or Caracalla.''
    Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "Peopleless Fiction," Alms for Oblivion (1964).
  • ''What is most appalling in an F. Scott Fitzgerald book is that it is peopleless fiction: Fitzgerald writes about spectral, muscled suits; dresses, hats, and sleeves which have some sort of vague, libidinous throb. These are plainly the product of sickness.''
    Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. "Peopleless Fiction," Alms for Oblivion (1964).
  • ''What most men desire is a virgin who is a whore.''
    Edward Dahlberg (1900-1977), U.S. author, critic. Reasons of the Heart, "On Lust," (1965).

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