Edward Morgan Forster


Edward Morgan Forster Quotes

  • ''Men fall into two classes—those who forget views and those who remember them.''
    E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. A Room with a View, pt. I, ch. 15 (1908). George Emerson's opinion repeated by Lucy Honeychurch.
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  • ''Tolerance is a very dull virtue. It is boring. Unlike love, it has always had a bad press. It is negative. It merely means putting up with people, being able to stand things.''
    E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Two Cheers for Democracy, "Tolerance," (1951). The essay, written in 1941, looked ahead to the post-war world, and the necessity to accept former enemies. "I don't ... regard tolerance as a great eternally established divine principle ..." Forster wrote. "It is just a makeshift, suitable for an overcrowded and overheated planet.... It's dull. And yet it entails imagination."
  • ''We cast a shadow on something wherever we stand.''
    E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. A Room with a View, pt. II, ch. 15 (1908). George Emerson's view.
  • ''I hate the idea of causes, and if I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend, I hope I should have the guts to betray my country.''
    E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Two Cheers for Democracy, "What I Believe," (1951).
  • ''She loved Cecil; George made her nervous; will the reader explain to her that the phrases should have been reversed?''
    E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. A Room with a View, pt. II, ch. 14 (1908).
  • ''Why does the soul always require a machine-gun?''
    E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. "What Has Germany Done to the Germans?" pt. I (1940), in Two Cheers for Democracy (1951). Originally part of an anti-Nazi radio broadcast.
  • ''He remained in the grip of a certain devil whom the modern world knows as self-consciousness, and whom the mediaeval, with dimmer vision, worshipped as asceticism.''
    E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. A Room with a View, pt. II, ch. 8 (1908). Concerning Cecil Vyse.
  • ''So, two cheers for Democracy: one because it admits variety and two because it permits criticism.''
    E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. "What I Believe," pt. II (1939), in Two Cheers for Democracy (1951).
  • ''Without form, the sensitiveness vanishes.''
    E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. "Art for Art's Sake," pt. II (1949), in Two Cheers for Democracy (1951). Originally an address delivered at the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
  • ''The more highly public life is organized the lower does its morality sink.''
    E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. "What I Believe," Two Cheers for Democracy (1951).

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