Elizabeth Barrett Browning

(6 March 1806 – 29 June 1861 / Durham / England)

Elizabeth Barrett Browning Poems

201. Sonnet 42 - 'My Future Will Not Copy Fair My Past' 1/13/2003
202. Sonnet X: Yet Love, Mere Love 1/3/2003
203. The Runaway Slave At Pilgrim's Point 12/31/2002
204. De Profundis 12/31/2002
205. Sonnet 29 - I Think Of Thee!&Mdash;My Thoughts Do Twine And Bud 1/13/2003
206. From ‘the Soul’s Travelling’ 1/1/2004
207. Patience Taught By Nature 5/12/2001
208. Mother And Poet 1/1/2004
209. Sonnet 10 - Yet, Love, Mere Love, Is Beautiful Indeed 1/13/2003
210. Pain In Pleasure 5/12/2001
211. Chorus Of Eden Spirits 1/1/2004
212. Grief 5/12/2001
213. Consolation 12/31/2002
214. Discontent 5/12/2001
215. Aurora Leigh (Excerpts) 1/1/2004
216. My Heart And I 1/1/2004
217. An Apprehension 5/12/2001
218. A Musical Instrument 5/12/2001
219. Adequacy 5/12/2001
220. Human Life’s Mystery 1/1/2004
221. A Year's Spinning 1/13/2003
222. Cheerfulness Taught By Reason 5/12/2001
223. A Thought For A Lonely Death-Bed 5/12/2001
224. A Sea-Side Walk 5/12/2001
225. The Best Thing In The World 12/31/2002
226. A Child Asleep 5/12/2001
227. A Man's Requirements 12/31/2002
228. Change Upon Change 5/12/2001
229. A Curse For A Nation 5/12/2001
230. A Dead Rose 5/12/2001
231. A Woman's Shortcomings 1/3/2003
232. Comfort 5/12/2001
233. The Cry Of The Children 12/31/2002
234. Sonnet 14 - If Thou Must Love Me, Let It Be For Nought 1/13/2003
235. Sonnet 43 - How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count The Ways 1/13/2003
236. How Do I Love Thee? 5/12/2001

Comments about Elizabeth Barrett Browning

  • Christina Murphy (5/6/2003 3:08:00 AM)

    I love poems! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

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Best Poem of Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Sonnet 14 - If Thou Must Love Me, Let It Be For Nought

XIV

If thou must love me, let it be for nought
Except for love's sake only. Do not say
'I love her for her smile—her look—her way
Of speaking gently,—for a trick of thought
That falls in well with mine, and certes brought
A sense of pleasant ease on such a day'—
For these things in themselves, Beloved, may
Be changed, or change for thee,—and love, so wrought,
May be unwrought so. Neither love me for
Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry,—
A creature might forget to weep, who bore
Thy comfort long, and lose thy ...

Read the full of Sonnet 14 - If Thou Must Love Me, Let It Be For Nought

Sonnet Xxi

Say over again, and yet once over again,
That thou dost love me. Though the word repeated
Should seem ' a cuckoo-song,' as thou dost treat it,
Remember, never to the hill or plain,
Valley and wood, without her cuckoo-strain
Comes the fresh Spring in all her green completed.
Beloved, I, amid the darkness greeted
By a doubtful spirit-voice, in that doubt's pain
Cry, ' Speak once more--thou lovest ! ' Who can fear

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