Elizabeth Cady Stanton


Elizabeth Cady Stanton Quotes

  • ''Human beings lose their logic in their vindictiveness.''
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. author, suffragist, and social reformer. Elizabeth Cady Stanton as Revealed in her Letters, Diary and Reminiscences, vol. 2, letter dated November 28, 1890 (1922).
    6 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''Words cannot describe the indignation ... a proud woman feels for her sex in disfranchisement.''
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. suffragist, social reformer, and author, Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist, and Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826-1898), U.S. suffragist. History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch. 19 (1882).
  • ''It is impossible for one class to appreciate the wrongs of another.''
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. suffragist, social reformer, and author, Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist, author, and social reformer, and Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826-1898), U.S. suffragist, author, and social reformer. History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch. 19 (1882). By "wrongs of," they meant "wrongs suffered by."
  • ''... strike the words "white male" from all your constitutions, and then, with fair sailing, let us sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish together.''
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. suffragist, social reformer, and author. As quoted in Feminism: The Essential Historical Writings, part 3, by Miriam Schnier (1972). The conclusion of her 1860 address to the New York State legislature.
  • ''Women and negroes, being seven-twelfths of the people, are a majority; and according to our republican theory, are the rightful rulers of the nation.''
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. suffragist, social reformer, and author. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch. 20, by Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, and herself (1882). Speaking to the New York Constitutional Convention on January 23, 1867.
  • ''The history of the past is but one long struggle upward to equality.''
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. suffragist, social reformer, and author. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch. 16, by Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, and herself (1882). From a March 1863 circular calling for a National Convention of the Woman's National Loyal League. It was held two months later in New York City.
  • ''The greatest block today in the way of woman's emancipation is the church, the canon law, the Bible and the priesthood.''
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. suffragist, social reformer, and author. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 5, ch. 1, by Ida Husted Harper (1922). From a paper sent to the thirty-third annual convention of the National Woman Suffrage Association and read aloud on May 30, 1901, by her longtime colleague and closest friend, Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906). At this point, Anthony and Stanton, both in their eighties, were "Honorary Presidents" of the Association. Anthony had opposed Stanton's submitting this paper, urging her instead to send one of her usual rousing arguments on behalf of suffrage. Stanton refused, saying that such statements were passe; creator of a controversial Woman's Bible (1895-1898), she had become very interested in the roles played by theology and the church in suppressing women's rights.
  • ''The True Republic—Men, their rights and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less.''
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. suffragist, and Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 1, ch. 21, by Ida Husted Harper (1898). This was the "motto" of their newspaper, The Revolution (1868-1970), which advocated suffrage and other rights for women.
  • ''I see by the papers that you have once more stirred that pool of intellectual stagnation, the educational convention.''
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. suffragist, social reformer, and author. As quoted in The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 1, ch. 10, by Ida Husted Harper (1898). In an 1857 letter to Susan B. Anthony, her close friend and sister activist, who had created a sensation at the State Teachers' Convention in Binghamton, NY, by advocating equal treatment of African Americans, girls, and women in education—as both students and teachers.
  • ''We found nothing grand in the history of the Jews nor in the morals inculcated in the Pentateuch.... I know of no other books that so fully teach the subjection and degradation of woman.''
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), U.S. campaigner for women's rights. Eight Years and More, ch. 24 (1898).

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]