Emily Jane Brontë

(30 July 1818 – 19 December 1848 / Thornton / Yorkshire)

Emily Jane Brontë Quotes

  • ''Having levelled my palace, don't erect a hovel and complacently admire your own charity in giving me that for a home.''
    Emily Brontë (1818-1848), British novelist, poet. Catherine, in Wuthering Heights, ch. 11 (1847). Said to Heathcliff, who had accused her of treating him impersonally.
    37 person liked.
    17 person did not like.
  • ''Any relic of the dead is precious, if they were valued living.''
    Emily Brontë (1818-1848), British novelist, poet. Ellen Dean, in Wuthering Heights, ch. 13 (1847). Said of a letter she has received from Isabella, unhappily married to Heathcliff.
    36 person liked.
    16 person did not like.
  • ''The tyrant grinds down his slaves and they don't turn against him, they crush those beneath them.''
    Emily Brontë (1818-1848), British novelist, poet. Heathcliff, in Wuthering Heights, ch. 11 (1847).
    28 person liked.
    12 person did not like.
  • ''I am now quite cured of seeking pleasure in society, be it country or town. A sensible man ought to find sufficient company in himself.''
    Emily Brontë (1818-1848), British novelist, poet. Mr. Lockwood, in Wuthering Heights, ch. 3 (1847).
    34 person liked.
    13 person did not like.
  • ''Proud people breed sad sorrows for themselves.''
    Emily Brontë (1818-1848), British novelist, poet. Nelly, in Wuthering Heights, ch. 7 (1847).
    31 person liked.
    13 person did not like.
  • ''A good heart will help you to a bonny face, my lad ... and a bad one will turn the bonniest into something worse than ugly.''
    Emily Brontë (1818-1848), British novelist, poet. Nelly, in Wuthering Heights, ch. 7 (1847). Speaking to Heathcliff.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

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Best Poem of Emily Jane Brontë

Love And Friendship

Love is like the wild rose-briar,
Friendship like the holly-tree --
The holly is dark when the rose-briar blooms
But which will bloom most contantly?
The wild-rose briar is sweet in the spring,
Its summer blossoms scent the air;
Yet wait till winter comes again
And who wil call the wild-briar fair?
Then scorn the silly rose-wreath now
And deck thee with the holly's sheen,
That when December blights thy brow
He may still leave thy garland green.

Read the full of Love And Friendship

Plead For Me

Oh, thy bright eyes must answer now,
When Reason, with a scornful brow,
Is mocking at my overthrow!
Oh, thy sweet tongue must plead for me
And tell, why I have chosen thee!

Stern Reason is to judgment come,
Arrayed in all her forms of gloom:
Wilt thou, my advocate, be dumb?

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