Flannery O'Connor


Flannery O'Connor Quotes

  • ''The Southerner is usually tolerant of those weaknesses that proceed from innocence.''
    Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. fiction writer and essayist. As quoted in review of The Devil's Dream, a book by Lee Smith, by Robert Houston (1992). O'Connor was a lifelong resident of Georgia.
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  • ''Even the ones who report favorably don't seem to have read the book.''
    Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. novelist, story writer, and essayist. As quoted in The Habit of Being (1979). From a letter, dated March 6, 1960, to her publisher, Robert Giroux; she was referring to the reviews he had forwarded of her second novel, The Violent Bear it Away.
  • ''I think they are the slobber-heartedest lily-mindedest piously conniving crowd in the modern world.''
    Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. novelist, story writer, and essayist. As quoted in The Habit of Being (1979). From a letter, dated September 1, 1963, to her anonymous correspondent "A." She was speaking of an interview conducted with her by a writer for an Atlanta magazine; before publication, their discussion of the "race question" was amended by an editor to the "social" crisis, "so that none of it makes much sense."
  • ''I have found that anything that comes out of the South is going to be called grotesque by the Northern reader, unless it is grotesque, in which case it is going to be called realistic.''
    Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. author. repr. in Mystery and Manners, eds. Sally and Robert Fitzgerald (1972). Cluster Review (Macon, 1965). "Some Aspects of the Grotesque in Southern Fiction," paper, read at Wesleyan College for Women, Macon, Georgia.
  • ''... the basic experience of everyone is the experience of human limitation.''
    Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. fiction writer and essayist. Mystery and Manners, part 4 (1969). Written in 1963.
  • ''... the novelist is bound by the reasonable possibilities, not the probabilities, of his culture.''
    Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. fiction writer and essayist. Mystery and Manners, part 5 (1969). From "Novelist and Believer," a paper given in March 1963 at a symposium at Sweet Briar College, Virginia.
  • ''... good and evil appear to be joined in every culture at the spine.''
    Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. fiction writer and essayist. Mystery and Manners, part 5 (1969). Written in 1963.
  • ''... the man in the violent situation reveals those qualities least dispensable in his personality, those qualities which are all he will have to take into eternity with him.''
    Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. fiction writer and essayist. Mystery and Manners, part 3 (1969). Written in 1957. O'Connor's stories and novels often contained violence. She was a devout Roman Catholic.
  • ''... the writer is initially set going by literature more than by life.''
    Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. fiction writer and essayist. Mystery and Manners, part 2 (1969). Written in 1957.
  • ''The writer can choose what he writes about but he cannot choose what he is able to make live.''
    Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), U.S. fiction writer and essayist. Mystery and Manners, part 2 (1969). Written in 1957. O'Connor's fiction was heavily populated with extreme eccentrics.

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