François Rabelais

(1494-1553 / Chinon)

François Rabelais Quotes

  • ''Indeed, said the monk, a mass, a matins, and vespers well rung are half-said.''
    François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Frere Jean, in Gargantua, ch. 40, p. 111, Pleiade edition (1995).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''How comes it that you curse, Frere Jean? It's only, said the monk, in order to embellish my language. They are the colors of Ciceronian rhetoric.''
    François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Frere Jean to Gargantua, in Gargantua, ch. 39, p. 109, Pleiade edition (1995).
  • ''How can I govern others, who can't even govern myself?''
    François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Frere Jean to Gargantua, in Gargantua, ch. 52, p. 137, Pleiade edition (1995). Proverbial locution attributed to Socrates.
  • ''A war undertaken without sufficient monies has but a wisp of force. Coins are the very sinews of battles.''
    François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Frere Jean to Grandgousier, in Gargantua, ch. 46, p. 126, Pleiade edition (1995).
  • ''Not anyone can be a cuckold. If you are a cuckold, ergo your wife will be beautiful, ergo you will be well treated by her; ergo you will have plenty of friends; ergo you will be saved.''
    François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Frere Jean to Panurge, in Third Book, ch. 28, p. 439, Pleiade edition (1995).
  • ''There is no truer cause of unhappiness amongst men than, where naturally expecting charity and benevolence, they receive harm and vexation.''
    François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Gallet to Pichrochole, in Gargantua, ch. 31, p. 86, Pleiade edition (1995).
  • ''There is nothing holy nor sacred to those who have abandoned God and reason in order to follow their perverse desires.''
    François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Gallet to Pichrochole, in Gargantua, ch. 31, p. 87, Pleiade edition (1995).
  • ''The scent of wine, oh how much more agreeable, laughing, praying, celestial and delicious it is than that of oil!''
    François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Gargantua, prologue, p. 7, Pleiade edition (1995). Author's metaphorical praise of inspiration versus toil.
  • ''Nature abhors a vacuum.''
    François Rabelais (c. 1494-1553), French monk, humanist, satirist, physician. Gargantua and Pantagruel, bk. 1, ch. 5 (1534), trans. by J.M. Cohen (1955). Originally a Latin proverb, "Natura abhorret vacuum."
  • ''To good and true love fear is forever affixed.''
    François Rabelais (1494-1553), French author, evangelist. Gargantua, in Fourth Book, ch. 3, p. 544, Pleiade edition (1995).

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]