Frances Burney

(1752-1840 / King's Lynn)

Frances Burney Quotes

  • ''I wish the opera was every night. It is, of all entertainments, the sweetest and most delightful. Some of the songs seemed to melt my very soul.''
    Frances Burney (1752-1840), British author. Evelina, in Evelina, letter 12 (1778).
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  • ''The mind is but too naturally prone to pleasure, but too easily yielded to dissipation.''
    Frances Burney (1752-1840), British author. Mr. Villars, in Evelina, letter 4 (1778).
  • ''A youthful mind is seldom totally free from ambition; to curb that, is the first step to contentment, since to diminish expectation is to increase enjoyment.''
    Frances Burney (1752-1840), British author. Mr. Villars, in Evelina, letter 4 (1778).
  • ''This artless young creature [Evelina], with too much beauty to escape notice, has too much sensibility to be indifferent to it; but she has too little wealth to be sought with propriety by men of the fashionable world.''
    Frances Burney (1752-1840), British author. Mr. Villars, in Evelina, letter 4 (1778).
  • ''O heavens! how short a time does it take to put an eternal end to a woman's liberty!''
    Frances Burney (1752-1840), British author. The Early Journals and Letters of Fanny Burney, vol. 1, p. 17, journal entry, July 20, 1768, ed. Lars E. Troide, Oxford University Press (1988). Burney on the wedding service.
  • ''From this moment, then, my dear girl—but why, permit me to ask, must a female be made Nobody? Ah! my dear, what were this world good for, were Nobody a female?''
    Frances Burney (1752-1840), British author. The Early Journals and Letters of Fanny Burney, vol. 1, p. 2, journal entry, March 27, 1768, ed. Lars E. Troide, Oxford University Press (1988). Burney addresses her secret journal to Miss "Nobody."
  • ''Insensibility, of all kinds, and on all occasions, most moves my imperial displeasure.''
    Frances Burney (1752-1840), British author. The Early Journals and Letters of Fanny Burney, vol. 1, p. 25, journal entry, August 10, 1768, ed. Lars E. Troide, Oxford University Press (1988).
  • ''There is something in age that ever, even in its own despite, must be venerable, must create respect—and to have it ill treated, is to me worse, more cruel and wicked than anything on earth.''
    Frances Burney (1752-1840), British author. The Early Journals and Letters of Fanny Burney, vol. 1, p. 27, journal entry, August 1768, ed. Lars E. Troide, Oxford University Press (1988).
  • ''We continually say things to support an opinion, which we have given, that in reality we don't above half mean.''
    Frances Burney (1752-1840), British author. The Early Journals and Letters of Fanny Burney, vol. 1, p. 46, journal entry, November 17, 1768, ed. Lars E. Troide, Oxford University Press (1988).
  • ''Money is the source of the greatest vice, and that nation which is most rich, is most wicked.''
    Frances Burney (1752-1840), British author. The Early Journals and Letters of Fanny Burney, vol. 1, p. 48, journal entry, November 17, 1768, ed. Lars E. Troide, Oxford University Press (1988). Burney quotes the conversation of the Scotsman Alexander Seton, her elder sister's suitor.

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