Francis Scott Fitzgerald

((1896 - 1940) / Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States)

Francis Scott Fitzgerald Quotes

  • ''It's not a slam at you when people are rude—it's a slam at the people they've met before.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Cecilia Brady, in The Last Tycoon, ch. 1 (1941).
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  • ''Every one suspects himself of at least one of the cardinal virtues.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. The narrator (Nick Carraway), in The Great Gatsby, ch. 3 (1925).
  • ''There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy, and the tired.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. The narrator (Nick Carraway), in The Great Gatsby, ch. 4 (1925).
  • ''What'll we do with ourselves this afternoon? And the day after that, and the next thirty years?''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Daisy Buchanan, in The Great Gatsby, ch. 7 (1925).
  • ''Speech is an arrangement of notes that will never be played again.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. The narrator (Nick Carraway), in The Great Gatsby, ch. 1 (1925). Describing Daisy Buchanan's "low, thrilling voice ... the kind of voice that the ear follows up and down."
  • ''No decent career was ever founded on a public.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. repr. In The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945). "Early Success," American Cavalcade (October 1937).
  • ''The compensation of a very early success is a conviction that life is a romantic matter. In the best sense one stays young.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. "Early Success," essay first published in American Cavalcade (Oct. 1937), The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).
  • ''It's a mining town in lotus land.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Wylie White, in The Last Tycoon, ch. 1 (1941).
  • ''Though the Jazz Age continued it became less and less an affair of youth. The sequel was like a children's party taken over by the elders.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. repr. In The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945). "Echoes of the Jazz Age," Scribner's (New York, Nov. 1931).
  • ''Trouble has no necessary connection with discouragement—discouragement has a germ of its own, as different from trouble as arthritis is different from a stiff joint.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. repr. In The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945). "Handle With Care," Esquire (New York, March 1936). As second part of Fitzgerald's Crack-Up series.

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Best Poem of Francis Scott Fitzgerald

Princeton - The Last Day

THE last light wanes and drifts across the land,
The low, long land, the sunny land of spires.
The ghosts of evening tune again their lyres
And wander singing, in a plaintive band
Down the long corridors of trees. Pale fires
Echo the night from tower top to tower.
Oh sleep that dreams and dream that never tires,
Press from the petals of the lotus-flower
Something of this to keep, the essence of an hour!

No more to wait the twilight of the moon
In this sequestrated vale of star and spire;
For one, eternal morning of desire
Passes to time and ...

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Marching Streets

Death slays the moon and the long dark deepens,
Hastens to the city, to the drear stone-heaps,
Films all eyes and whispers on the corners,
Whispers to the corners that the last soul sleeps.

Gay grow the streets now torched by yellow lamplight,
March all directions with a long sure tread.
East, west they wander through the blinded city,
Rattle on the windows like the wan-faced dead.

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