Francis Scott Fitzgerald

((1896 - 1940) / Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States)

Francis Scott Fitzgerald Quotes

  • ''In a real dark night of the soul it is always three o'clock in the morning, day after day.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945). Handle With Care, first published in Esquire (New York, March 1936). The article constituted the second part of Fitzgerald's Crack-Up series. The Dark Night of the Soul is the title of a poem and commentary by the 16th-century Spanish mystic San Juan de la Cruz (St. John of the Cross).
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  • ''In a real dark night of the soul it is always three o'clock in the morning, day after day.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945). Handle With Care, first published in Esquire (New York, March 1936). The article constituted the second part of Fitzgerald's Crack-Up series. The Dark Night of the Soul is the title of a poem and commentary by the 16th-century Spanish mystic San Juan de la Cruz (St. John of the Cross).
  • ''His was a great sin who first invented consciousness. Let us lose it for a few hours.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. John, in The Diamond as Big as the Ritz, ch. 11 (1922). Uttered before falling asleep.
  • ''Everybody's youth is a dream, a form of chemical madness.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. John, in The Diamond as Big as the Ritz, ch. 11 (1922). Kismine replies, "How pleasant then to be insane!"
  • ''At any rate, let us love for a while, for a year or so, you and me. That's a form of divine drunkenness that we can all try.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. John to Kismine, in The Diamond as Big as the Ritz, ch. 11 (1922).
  • ''I like people and I like them to like me, but I wear my heart where God put it—on the inside.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Monroe Stahr, in The Last Tycoon, ch. 1 (1941).
  • ''The hangover became a part of the day as well allowed-for as the Spanish siesta.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. First published in Esquire (New York, July 1932). My Lost City, The Crack-Up, ed. Edmund Wilson (1945).
  • ''One of those men who reach such an acute limited excellence at twenty-one that everything afterward savors of anti-climax.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Narrator (Nick Carraway) describing Tom Buchanan, in The Great Gatsby, ch. 1 (1925).
  • ''The intimate revelations of young men, or at least the terms in which they express them, are usually plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Narrator (Nick Carraway), in The Great Gatsby, ch. 1 (1925).
  • ''Thirty—the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning brief-case of enthusiasm, thinning hair.''
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940), U.S. author. Narrator (Nick Carraway), in The Great Gatsby, ch. 7 (1925).

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Best Poem of Francis Scott Fitzgerald

The Staying Up All Night

The warm fire.
The comfortable chairs.
The merry companions.
The stroke of twelve.
The wild suggestion.
The good sports.
The man who hasn't slept for weeks.
The people who have done it before.
The long anecdotes.
The best looking girl yawns.
The forced raillery.
The stroke of one.
The best looking girl goes to bed.
The stroke of two.
The empty pantry.
The lack of firewood.
The second best looking girl goes to bed.
The weather-beaten ones who don't.
The stroke of four.
The dozing off.
The amateur 'life of the party.'

Read the full of The Staying Up All Night

On A Play Twice Seen

HERE in the figured dark I watch once more;
There with the curtain rolls a year away,
A year of years — There was an idle day
Of ours, when happy endings didn't bore
Our unfermented souls, and rocks held ore:
Your little face beside me, wide-eyed, gay,
Smiled its own repertoire, while the poor play
Reached me as a faint ripple reaches shore.

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