Franklin Pierce Adams

[F.P.A.] (15 November 1881 – 23 March 1960 / Chicago, Illinois)

Franklin Pierce Adams Poems

1. How 3/30/2012
2. The Ballade Of The Average Reader 3/30/2012
3. Help 3/30/2012
4. Ballade Of The Hardy Annual 3/30/2012
5. Bedbooks 3/30/2012
6. To A Light Houskeeper 3/30/2012
7. Office Mottoes 3/30/2012
8. 'Carpe Diem,' Or Cop The Day 3/30/2012
9. No Good Deed Goes Unpunished 3/30/2012
10. Those Two Boys 3/30/2012
11. A Plea 3/30/2012
12. An Election Night Pantoum 3/30/2012
13. A Summer Summary 3/30/2012
14. A Quatrain 3/30/2012
15. Ballade Of The Breakfast Table 3/30/2012
16. Advice 3/30/2012
17. An Ultimatum To Myrtilla 3/30/2012
18. And Yet It Is A Gentle Art 3/30/2012
19. To W. Hohenzollern, On Discontinuing The Conning Tower 1/3/2003
20. The Ballad Of Justifiable Homicide 1/3/2003
21. Lines On And From 1/3/2003
22. Old Environment 1/3/2003
23. Vain Words 1/3/2003
24. Rich Man 3/30/2012
25. On Profiteering 1/3/2003
26. To W. Hohenzollern, On Resuming The Conning Tower 1/3/2003
27. Variation On A Theme 1/3/2003
28. Thoughts In A Far Country 1/3/2003
29. Maud Muller Mutatur 1/3/2003
30. A Soft Susurrus 3/30/2012
31. A Word For It 3/30/2012
32. A Wish 3/30/2012
33. I'M Out Of The Army Now 1/3/2003
34. Regarding (1) The U.S. And (2) New York 1/3/2003
35. Song Of Synthetic Virility 1/3/2003
36. The Last Laugh 1/3/2003
37. A Poor Excuse, But Our Own 3/30/2012
38. Oh Man! 1/3/2003
39. Unshackled Thoughts On Chivalry, Romance, Adventure, Etc. 1/3/2003
40. It Was A Famous Victory 1/3/2003
Best Poem of Franklin Pierce Adams

Baseball's Sad Lexicon

These are the saddest of possible words:
Tinker to Evers to Chance.
Trio of Bear-cubs, fleeter than birds,
Tinker to Evers to Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
Making a Giant hit into a double --
Words that are weighty with nothing but trouble:
Tinker to Evers to Chance.

Read the full of Baseball's Sad Lexicon

Recuerdo

We were very tired, we were very merry--
We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry.
It was bare and bright, and smelled like a stable--
But we looked into a fire, we leaned across a table,
We lay on a hilltop underneath the moon;
And the whistles kept blowing, and the dawn came soon.

We were very tired, we were very merry--
We had gone back and forth all night on the ferry,

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