Franklin Pierce Adams

[F.P.A.] (15 November 1881 – 23 March 1960 / Chicago, Illinois)

Franklin Pierce Adams Poems

1. How 3/30/2012
2. The Ballade Of The Average Reader 3/30/2012
3. Help 3/30/2012
4. Ballade Of The Hardy Annual 3/30/2012
5. Bedbooks 3/30/2012
6. To A Light Houskeeper 3/30/2012
7. Office Mottoes 3/30/2012
8. 'Carpe Diem,' Or Cop The Day 3/30/2012
9. No Good Deed Goes Unpunished 3/30/2012
10. A Plea 3/30/2012
11. An Election Night Pantoum 3/30/2012
12. A Summer Summary 3/30/2012
13. A Quatrain 3/30/2012
14. Ballade Of The Breakfast Table 3/30/2012
15. Advice 3/30/2012
16. An Ultimatum To Myrtilla 3/30/2012
17. And Yet It Is A Gentle Art 3/30/2012
18. To W. Hohenzollern, On Discontinuing The Conning Tower 1/3/2003
19. The Ballad Of Justifiable Homicide 1/3/2003
20. Lines On And From 1/3/2003
21. Old Environment 1/3/2003
22. Vain Words 1/3/2003
23. Rich Man 3/30/2012
24. On Profiteering 1/3/2003
25. To W. Hohenzollern, On Resuming The Conning Tower 1/3/2003
26. Variation On A Theme 1/3/2003
27. Thoughts In A Far Country 1/3/2003
28. Maud Muller Mutatur 1/3/2003
29. A Soft Susurrus 3/30/2012
30. A Word For It 3/30/2012
31. A Wish 3/30/2012
32. I'M Out Of The Army Now 1/3/2003
33. Regarding (1) The U.S. And (2) New York 1/3/2003
34. Song Of Synthetic Virility 1/3/2003
35. Those Two Boys 3/30/2012
36. The Last Laugh 1/3/2003
37. A Poor Excuse, But Our Own 3/30/2012
38. Oh Man! 1/3/2003
39. Unshackled Thoughts On Chivalry, Romance, Adventure, Etc. 1/3/2003
40. It Was A Famous Victory 1/3/2003

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Best Poem of Franklin Pierce Adams

Baseball's Sad Lexicon

These are the saddest of possible words:
Tinker to Evers to Chance.
Trio of Bear-cubs, fleeter than birds,
Tinker to Evers to Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
Making a Giant hit into a double --
Words that are weighty with nothing but trouble:
Tinker to Evers to Chance.

Read the full of Baseball's Sad Lexicon

Rus. Vs. Urbs

Whenever the penner of this pome
Regards a lovely country home,
He sighs, in words not insincere,
"I think I'd like to live out here."

And when the builder of this ditty
Returns to this pulsating city,
The perpetrator of this pome
Yearns for a lovely country home.

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