Franz Kafka

(3 July 1883 – 3 June 1924 / Prague, Bohemia)

Franz Kafka Quotes

  • ''Believing means liberating the indestructible element in oneself, or, more accurately, liberating oneself, or, more accurately, being indestructible, or, more accurately, being.''
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Third Notebook, November 30, 1917. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''It is often safer to be in chains than to be free.''
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Czech novelist, short-story writer. The Advocate, in The Trial, ch. 8 (1925, trans. 1935). An echo of Rousseau's famous dictum.
  • ''The founder brought the laws from the lawgiver; the faithful are meant to announce the laws to the lawgiver.''
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Third Notebook, November 21, 1917. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).
  • ''It is not necessary that you leave the house. Remain at your table and listen. Do not even listen, only wait. Do not even wait, be wholly still and alone. The world will present itself to you for its unmasking, it can do no other, in ecstacy it will writhe at your feet.''
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Czech novelist, short story writer. written Oct. 1917-Feb. 1918. The Collected Aphorisms, vol. 1, no. 109, Shorter Works, ed. and trans. by Malcolm Pasley (1973).
  • ''Believing in progress does not mean believing that any progress has yet been made.''
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Third Notebook, December 4, 1917. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).
  • ''You can hold yourself back from the sufferings of the world, that is something you are free to do and it accords with your nature, but perhaps this very holding back is the one suffering you could avoid.''
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), German novelist, short-story writer. repr. In Shorter Works, vol. 1, ed. and trans. by Malcolm Pasley (1973). The Collected Aphorisms, no. 103 (Oct. 1917-Feb. 1918).
  • ''Religions get lost as people do.''
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Fourth Notebook, February 26, 1918. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).
  • ''A first sign of the beginning of understanding is the wish to die.''
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), German novelist and short story writer. The Collected Aphorisms, no. 13 (Oct. 1917-Feb. 1918); published in Shorter Works, vol. 1, ed. and trans. by Malcolm Pasley (1973).
  • ''There is a down-and-outness under true knowledge and a childlike happy arising from it.''
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), Prague German Jewish author, novelist. The Third Notebook, December 19, 1917. The Blue Octavo Notebooks, ed. Max Brod, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins. Exact Change, Cambridge, MA (1991). Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings, trans. by Ernst Kaiser and Eithne Wilkins, New York, Schocken Books (1954).
  • ''A belief is like a guillotine, just as heavy, just as light.''
    Franz Kafka (1883-1924), German novelist, short-story writer. Shorter Works, vol. 1, ed. and trans. by Malcolm Pasley (1973). The Collected Aphorisms, no. 87 (Oct. 1917-Feb. 1918).

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]