George Orwell

(1903 - 1950)

George Orwell Quotes

  • ''Politically, Swift was one of those people who are driven into a sort of perverse Toryism by the follies of the progressive party of the moment.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British novelist. (1946). "Politics vs. Literature: An Examination of Gulliver's Travels," CEJL, vol. 4, "In Front of Your Nose: 1945-1950," p. 207.
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  • ''Saints should always be judged guilty until they are proved innocent.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. "Reflections on Gandhi," Shooting an Elephant (1950). opening words of the essay. Orwell was deeply skeptical of the desire for sainthood: "It is probable," he wrote, "that some who achieve or aspire to sainthood have never felt much temptation to be human beings."
  • ''The main motive for "nonattachment" is a desire to escape from the pain of living, and above all from love, which, sexual or non-sexual, is hard work.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. "Reflections on Gandhi," Shooting an Elephant (1950).
  • ''To an ordinary human being, love means nothing if it does not mean loving some people more than others.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. "Reflections on Gandhi," Shooting an Elephant (1950).
  • ''The intellectual is different from the ordinary man, but only in certain sections of his personality, and even then not all the time.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. In Critical Essays (1947). "Rudyard Kipling," (1942).
  • ''Power-worship blurs political judgement because it leads, almost unavoidably, to the belief that present trends will continue. Whoever is winning at the moment will always seem to be invincible.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. "Second Thoughts on James Burnham," Shooting an Elephant (1950).
  • ''The quickest way of ending a war is to lose it.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. First published in Polemic (May 1946). Shooting an Elephant, "Second Thoughts on James Burnham," (1950).
  • ''Serious sport has nothing to do with fair play. It is bound up with hatred, jealousy, boastfulness, disregard of all rules and sadistic pleasure in witnessing violence: in other words it is war minus the shooting.
    ''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. Shooting an Elephant, "I Write As I Please," (1950).
  • ''One can love a child, perhaps, more deeply than one can love another adult, but it is rash to assume that the child feels any love in return.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, eds. Sonia Orwell and Ian Angus (1968). "Such, Such Were the Joys," (1947). Orwell added: "Looking back on my own childhood, after the infant years were over, I do not believe that I ever felt love for any mature person, except my mother.... Love, the spontaneous, unqualified emotion of love was something I could only feel for people who were young."
  • ''Not to expose your true feelings to an adult seems to be instinctive from the age of seven or eight onwards.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, eds. Sonia Orwell and Ian Angus (1968). "Such, Such Were the Joys," (1947).

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Best Poem of George Orwell

Ironic Poem About Prostitution

When I was young and had no sense
In far-off Mandalay
I lost my heart to a Burmese girl
As lovely as the day.

Her skin was gold, her hair was jet,
Her teeth were ivory;
I said, 'for twenty silver pieces,
Maiden, sleep with me'.

She looked at me, so pure, so sad,
The loveliest thing alive,
And in her lisping, virgin voice,
Stood out for twenty-five.

Read the full of Ironic Poem About Prostitution

Kitchener

No stone is set to mark his nation's loss,
No stately tomb enshrines his noble breast;
Not e'en the tribute of a wooden cross
Can mark this hero's rest.
He needs them not, his name untarnished stands,
Remindful of the mighty deeds he worked,
Footprints of one, upon time's changeful sands,
Who ne'er his duty shirked.

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