George Orwell

(1903 - 1950)

George Orwell Quotes

  • ''Part of the reason for the ugliness of adults, in a child's eyes, is that the child is usually looking upwards, and few faces are at their best when seen from below.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, eds. Sonia Orwell and Ian Angus (1968). "Such, Such Were the Joys," (1947).
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  • ''No one can look back on his schooldays and say with truth that they were altogether unhappy.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, eds. Sonia Orwell and Ian Angus (1968). "Such, Such Were the Joys," (1947).
  • ''I doubt whether classical education ever has been or can be successfully carried out without corporal punishment.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British novelist. "Such, Such Were the Joys ... ," Part 1 (1947).
  • ''Don't you see that the whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought? In the end we shall make thoughtcrime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. Symes, in Nineteen Eighty-Four, pt. 1, ch. 5 (1949).
  • ''On the whole, human beings want to be good, but not too good, and not quite all the time.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. In Collected Essays (1961). "The Art of Donald McGill," Horizon (London, Sept. 1941).
  • ''The high sentiments always win in the end, the leaders who offer blood, toil, tears and sweat always get more out of their followers than those who offer safety and a good time. When it comes to the pinch, human beings are heroic.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. In Collected Essays (1961). "The Art of Donald McGill," Horizon (London, September 1941).
  • ''A dirty joke is a sort of mental rebellion.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. In Collected Essays (1961). The Art of Donald McGill, Horizon (London, Sept. 1941).
  • ''Language ought to be the joint creation of poets and manual workers.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, vol. 3, eds. Sonia Orwell and Ian Angus (1968). "The English People," (1944).
  • ''The English are probably more capable than most peoples of making revolutionary change without bloodshed. In England, if anywhere, it would be possible to abolish poverty without destroying liberty.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, vol. 3, eds. Sonia Orwell and Ian Angus (1968). "The English People," (1944).
  • ''As a rule they will refuse even to sample a foreign dish, they regard such things as garlic and olive oil with disgust, life is unliveable to them unless they have tea and puddings.''
    George Orwell (1903-1950), British author. repr. in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, vol. 3, eds. Sonia Orwell and Ian Angus (1968). "The English People," (1944). On the English attitude toward food.

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Best Poem of George Orwell

Ironic Poem About Prostitution

When I was young and had no sense
In far-off Mandalay
I lost my heart to a Burmese girl
As lovely as the day.

Her skin was gold, her hair was jet,
Her teeth were ivory;
I said, 'for twenty silver pieces,
Maiden, sleep with me'.

She looked at me, so pure, so sad,
The loveliest thing alive,
And in her lisping, virgin voice,
Stood out for twenty-five.

Read the full of Ironic Poem About Prostitution

Kitchener

No stone is set to mark his nation's loss,
No stately tomb enshrines his noble breast;
Not e'en the tribute of a wooden cross
Can mark this hero's rest.
He needs them not, his name untarnished stands,
Remindful of the mighty deeds he worked,
Footprints of one, upon time's changeful sands,
Who ne'er his duty shirked.

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