Gilbert Keith Chesterton

(29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936 / London, England)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton Quotes

  • ''Man does not live by soap alone; and hygiene, or even health, is not much good unless you can take a healthy view of it—or, better still, feel a healthy indifference to it.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On St. George Revivified," All I Survey (1933).
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  • ''What affects men sharply about a foreign nation is not so much finding or not finding familiar things; it is rather not finding them in the familiar place.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On Flags," Generally Speaking (1928).
  • ''I do not believe in a fate that falls on men however they act; but I do believe in a fate that falls on them unless they act.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On Holland," Generally Speaking (1928).
  • ''The dignity of the artist lies in his duty of keeping awake the sense of wonder in the world. In this long vigil he often has to vary his methods of stimulation; but in this long vigil he is also himself striving against a continual tendency to sleep.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On Maltreating Words," Generally Speaking (1928).
  • ''The Museum is not meant either for the wanderer to see by accident or for the pilgrim to see with awe. It is meant for the mere slave of a routine of self-education to stuff himself with every sort of incongruous intellectual food in one indigestible meal.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On Sightseeing," All Is Grist (1931).
  • ''The true object of all human life is play. Earth is a task garden; heaven is a playground.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Oxford from Without," All Things Considered (1908).
  • ''Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Policeman, in The Man Who Was Thursday, ch. 4 (1908).
  • ''The cosmos is about the smallest hole that a man can hide his head in.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Orthodoxy, ch. 1 (1909).
  • ''Courage is almost a contradiction in terms. It means a strong desire to live taking the form of a readiness to die.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Orthodoxy, ch. 6 (1909).
  • ''Journalism is popular, but it is popular mainly as fiction. Life is one world, and life seen in the newspapers another.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On the Cryptic and the Elliptic," All Things Considered (1908).

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Best Poem of Gilbert Keith Chesterton

The Rolling English Road

Before the Roman came to Rye or out to Severn strode,
The rolling English drunkard made the rolling English road.
A reeling road, a rolling road, that rambles round the shire,
And after him the parson ran, the sexton and the squire;
A merry road, a mazy road, and such as we did tread
The night we went to Birmingham by way of Beachy Head.

I knew no harm of Bonaparte and plenty of the Squire,
And for to fight the Frenchman I did not much desire;
But I did bash their baggonets because they came arrayed
To straighten out the crooked road an English drunkard ...

Read the full of The Rolling English Road

The Great Minimum

It is something to have wept as we have wept,
It is something to have done as we have done,
It is something to have watched when all men slept,
And seen the stars which never see the sun.

It is something to have smelt the mystic rose,
Although it break and leave the thorny rods,
It is something to have hungered once as those
Must hunger who have ate the bread of gods.

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