Gilbert Keith Chesterton

(29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936 / London, England)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton Quotes

  • ''A puritan is a person who pours righteous indignation into the wrong things.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. New York Times (Nov. 21, 1930).
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  • ''There is nothing the matter with Americans except their ideals. The real American is all right; it is the ideal American who is all wrong.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. New York Times (Feb. 1, 1931).
  • ''Democracy means government by the uneducated, while aristocracy means government by the badly educated.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. New York Times (Feb. 1, 1931).
  • ''We are justified in enforcing good morals, for they belong to all mankind; but we are not justified in enforcing good manners, for good manners always mean our own manners.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Limericks and Counsels of Perfection," All Things Considered (1908).
  • ''Nothing is poetical if plain daylight is not poetical; and no monster should amaze us if the normal man does not amaze.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On Experience," All Is Grist (1931).
  • ''Compromise used to mean that half a loaf was better than no bread. Among modern statesmen it really seems to mean that half a loaf is better than a whole loaf.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. What's Wrong with the World, ch. 3 (1910).
  • ''Science in the modern world has many uses; its chief use, however, is to provide long words to cover the errors of the rich.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Celts and Celtophiles," Heretics (1905).
  • ''The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting. It has been found difficult; and left untried.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. What's Wrong With the World, pt. 1, ch. 5 (1910).
  • ''The honest poor can sometimes forget poverty. The honest rich can never forget it.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Cockneys and Their Jokes," All Things Considered (1908).
  • ''If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. What's Wrong With the World, pt. 4, ch. 14 (1910).

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Best Poem of Gilbert Keith Chesterton

A Ballade Of Suicide

The gallows in my garden, people say,
Is new and neat and adequately tall;
I tie the noose on in a knowing way
As one that knots his necktie for a ball;
But just as all the neighbours--on the wall--
Are drawing a long breath to shout "Hurray!"
The strangest whim has seized me. . . . After all
I think I will not hang myself to-day.

To-morrow is the time I get my pay--
My uncle's sword is hanging in the hall--
I see a little cloud all pink and grey--
Perhaps the rector's mother will not call-- I fancy that I heard from Mr. Gall
That mushrooms could be ...

Read the full of A Ballade Of Suicide

The Great Minimum

It is something to have wept as we have wept,
It is something to have done as we have done,
It is something to have watched when all men slept,
And seen the stars which never see the sun.

It is something to have smelt the mystic rose,
Although it break and leave the thorny rods,
It is something to have hungered once as those
Must hunger who have ate the bread of gods.

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