Gilbert Keith Chesterton

(29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936 / London, England)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton Quotes

  • ''A puritan is a person who pours righteous indignation into the wrong things.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. New York Times (Nov. 21, 1930).
    3 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''There is nothing the matter with Americans except their ideals. The real American is all right; it is the ideal American who is all wrong.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. New York Times (Feb. 1, 1931).
  • ''Democracy means government by the uneducated, while aristocracy means government by the badly educated.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. New York Times (Feb. 1, 1931).
  • ''We are justified in enforcing good morals, for they belong to all mankind; but we are not justified in enforcing good manners, for good manners always mean our own manners.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Limericks and Counsels of Perfection," All Things Considered (1908).
  • ''Nothing is poetical if plain daylight is not poetical; and no monster should amaze us if the normal man does not amaze.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "On Experience," All Is Grist (1931).
  • ''Compromise used to mean that half a loaf was better than no bread. Among modern statesmen it really seems to mean that half a loaf is better than a whole loaf.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. What's Wrong with the World, ch. 3 (1910).
  • ''Science in the modern world has many uses; its chief use, however, is to provide long words to cover the errors of the rich.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Celts and Celtophiles," Heretics (1905).
  • ''The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting. It has been found difficult; and left untried.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. What's Wrong With the World, pt. 1, ch. 5 (1910).
  • ''The honest poor can sometimes forget poverty. The honest rich can never forget it.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "Cockneys and Their Jokes," All Things Considered (1908).
  • ''If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. What's Wrong With the World, pt. 4, ch. 14 (1910).

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of Gilbert Keith Chesterton

The Rolling English Road

Before the Roman came to Rye or out to Severn strode,
The rolling English drunkard made the rolling English road.
A reeling road, a rolling road, that rambles round the shire,
And after him the parson ran, the sexton and the squire;
A merry road, a mazy road, and such as we did tread
The night we went to Birmingham by way of Beachy Head.

I knew no harm of Bonaparte and plenty of the Squire,
And for to fight the Frenchman I did not much desire;
But I did bash their baggonets because they came arrayed
To straighten out the crooked road an English drunkard ...

Read the full of The Rolling English Road

The Old Song

A livid sky on London
And like the iron steeds that rear
A shock of engines halted
And I knew the end was near:
And something said that far away, over the hills and far away
There came a crawling thunder and the end of all things here.
For London Bridge is broken down, broken down, broken down,
As digging lets the daylight on the suken streets of yore,
The lightning looked on London town, the broken bridge of London

[Report Error]