Gilbert Keith Chesterton

(29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936 / London, England)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton Quotes

  • ''True contentment is a thing as active as agriculture. It is the power of getting out of any situation all that there is in it. It is arduous and it is rare.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Contented Man," A Miscellany of Men (1912).
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  • ''"My country, right or wrong" is a thing that no patriot would think of saying except in a desperate case. It is like saying "My mother, drunk or sober."''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. The Defendant, "Defence of Patriotism," (1901). See Decatur.
  • ''All slang is metaphor, and all metaphor is poetry.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. The Defendant, "A Defence of Slang," (1901).
  • ''What people call impartiality may simply mean indifference, and what people call partiality may simply mean mental activity.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Error of Impartiality," All Things Considered (1908).
  • ''Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes—our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to the small and arrogant oligarchy of those who merely happen to be walking around.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Ethics of England," ch. 4, Orthodoxy (1909).
  • ''We call a man a bigot or a slave of dogma because he is a thinker who has thought thoroughly and to a definite end.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Error of Impartiality," All Things Considered (1908).
  • ''The greenhorn is the ultimate victor in everything; it is he that gets the most out of life.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Fairy Pickwick," A Shilling for My Thoughts (1916).
  • ''A new philosophy generally means in practice the praise of some old vice.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Methuselahite," All Things Considered (1908).
  • ''The ordinary scientific man is strictly a sentimentalist. He is a sentimentalist in this essential sense, that he is soaked and swept away by mere associations.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Logic of Elfland," Orthodoxy (1908).
  • ''With any recovery from morbidity there must go a certain healthy humiliation.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. The Man Who Was Thursday, ch. 8 (1908).

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Best Poem of Gilbert Keith Chesterton

The Last Hero

The wind blew out from Bergen from the dawning to the day,
There was a wreck of trees and fall of towers a score of miles away,
And drifted like a livid leaf I go before its tide,
Spewed out of house and stable, beggared of flag and bride.
The heavens are bowed about my head, shouting like seraph wars,
With rains that might put out the sun and clean the sky of stars,
Rains like the fall of ruined seas from secret worlds above,
The roaring of the rains of God none but the lonely love.
Feast in my hall, O foemen, and eat and drink and drain,
You never loved the sun in...

Read the full of The Last Hero

The Great Minimum

It is something to have wept as we have wept,
It is something to have done as we have done,
It is something to have watched when all men slept,
And seen the stars which never see the sun.

It is something to have smelt the mystic rose,
Although it break and leave the thorny rods,
It is something to have hungered once as those
Must hunger who have ate the bread of gods.

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